Africa

Household methodologies (HHM) intervene directly in intra-household gender relations to strengthen overall smallholder agency and efficacy as economic agents and development actors. Strengthening women's agency is one mechanism for progressing towards collaborative, systemic farm management. It is expected this will contribute to improved farm resilience in the face of climate change, strengthen food and nutrition security, and improve other development indicators related to SDGs 2 and 5.
This paper explores the impact of mobile phones on gender equality and nutrition in Uganda. Using panel data from rural Ugandan smallholder farmers, the researchers analysed the social welfare effects of mobile phones. A positive connection is found between increasing female mobile phone use and improvement in nutrition, relating to SDG 2 and SDG 5 and where women have access to and use a mobile phone the impact was greater.
Ruth Machuma Ndunde with her cow
Nearly 30 years on from its launch by a group of UK West Country dairy farmers, the charity Send a Cow is making a big difference to people’s lives in seven countries in Africa. With its new campaign under way, Farmers Weekly finds out what the charity hopes to achieve and how farmers abroad are benefiting with the help of their UK counterparts. Endeavours such as this support SDG 1 No Poverty, and SDG 2 Zero Hunger and are a great example of SDG 17 Partnerships for the goals in action.
Ecological infrastructure (EI) refers to ecosystems that deliver services to society, functioning as a nature-based equivalent of, or complement to, built infrastructure. EI is critical for socio-economic development, supporting a suite of development imperatives at local, national and international scales. This paper presents the myriad of ways that EI supports sustainable development, using South Africa and the South African National Development Plan as a case study, linking to the Sustainable Development Goals on a global level. We show the need for EI across numerous development and sustainability issues, including food security, water provision, and poverty alleviation contributing to several SDGs not least, goals 1, 11 and 17.
Despite its potential advantages, a bioenergy system poses several conceptual and operational challenges for academic as well as practical scrutiny because the inherent relationship and the intersection of areas related to energy production and agricultural activity requires a deeply integrated assessment. The aim of this paper is to review the available works in this field and propose an approach for supporting policymakers in the decision taking process of deploying sustainable bioenergy systems and in doing so, help to inform SDG 7.
Elsevier,

Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Volume 76, September 2017, Pages 72-80

Under SDG 7, there are targets to increase renewable energy sources that include biomass, hydroelectric, wind, solar and hydrothermal systems, are carbon-neutral, releasing relatively no emissions. This paper discusses the initiatives associated with the provision of renewable energy to the energy mix in Nigeria as an indication of the country’s commitment to adopt a sustainable development strategy in shaping the economy. The paper identifies social and political obstacles as the most significant roadblocks towards rapid implementation of a green economy through the deployment of renewable energy for sustainable development.
This papers examines sustainable tourism in a United Nations biosphere reserve, advancing the knowledge on SDG 12 target B. It uses critical discourse analysis to understand active stakeholder perspectives and shows that understanding power and ideology is fundamental to sustainable tourism. This paper adds to the literature on stakeholder analysis in tourism specifically and also has wider implications for sustainable development more generally.
Elsevier,

Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Volume 75, August 2017, Pages 393–401

This article discusses how the SDGs can be used to motivate investments in Renewable Energy (RE) in Africa. Using the SDGs as a benchmark for inclusive and sustainable growth the synergy effects provided by RE are identified and an analysis of possible leverage points, available instruments and involved actors shows that there remains a large additional potential. The authors argue that expansion of Renewable Energy supports the fulfillment of at least 10 of the 17 SDGs.
This study makes important links between SDG 2, SDG 5 and SDG 13 through its examination of how husbands and wives within the same household perceive climate risks and use group-based approaches as coping strategies. The findings indicate that options for adapting to climate change closely interplay with husbands' and wives' roles and responsibilities, social norms, risk perceptions and access to resources. A higher percentage of wives were found to adopt crop-related strategies, whereas husbands employ livestock- and agroforestry-related strategies.
SDG 5 aims to achieve gender equality and empower all women and girls. But how do you measure empowerment? In The Lancet Global Health, Fernanda Ewerling and colleagues use a set of questions from surveys routinely carried out in Africa to develop a survey-based women’s empowerment index (SWPER). The questions include whether a woman thinks being beaten by her husband is justified and who makes household decisions. The authors validate the index externally and demonstrate that it can be used to compare gender empowerment across African countries.

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