Europe

Human trafficking is one of the main profit-generating activities for organised criminals in Europe and the revenue generated is often laundered through the financial system. Understanding the complexities of human trafficking is vital to both SDG 8.7 to take immediate and effective measures to eradicate forced labour, end modern slavery and human trafficking and SDG 16.4 to significantly reduce illicit financial and arms flows, strengthen the recovery and return of stolen assets and combat all forms of organized crime.
The UK's Modern Slavery Act 2015 aims to make businesses accountable for forced labour in their supply chains: large organisations with a presence in the UK are required to produce an annual ‘slavery and human trafficking statement’ detailing the action they have taken. A report from Ergon Associates shows that the majority of statements already submitted are lacking in key information and meaningful action. The Act directly addresses SDG 8.7 to eradicate modern slavery and human trafficking by 2025.
Elsevier,

Environmental Science & Policy, April 2016, Pages 123 - 130

‘Sustainability’ is strategically framed in the context of infrastructure governance in the Netherlands. The open-ended character of sustainability makes it a good discursive concept in governance of large-scale infrastructure projects. This paper discusses some of the implications of the dynamics of sustainability in today’s complex and multi-dimensional world of governance. Prioritising sustainability in infrastructure contributes to the advancement of SDG 9.1 to develop reliable and resilient infrastructure to support economic development and human well-being.
The LexisNexis Human Trafficking Awareness Index™ highlights emerging trends and patterns of awareness within and across national borders. The Index uses the respected Nexis® service to track and analyse the volume of articles related to human trafficking. These insights assist activists working to combat human trafficking and contribute to the advancement of SDG target 8.7 to eradicate forced labour, end modern slavery and human trafficking by 2025.
Workers in an office
Although gender pay gap reporting legislation in the UK does not come into force until early 2017, employers may have to collect gender pay gap data from as early as April 2016. To help HR professionals get ready for their reporting obligations, XpertHR has compiled helpful FAQs and a timeline. Gender pay gap reporting advances SDG 5.C to adopt and strengthen sound policies and enforceable legislation for the promotion of gender equality, as well as SDG 10.
This Elsevier report provides evidence and analysis on potential gender gaps in science research in Germany by linking data from Scopus to data from a large online social networking service. This type of analysis is vital for advancing SDG 5.2 to end all forms of discrimination against all women and girls everywhere.
The potential impact of dietary changes on health, the agricultural system and other environmental factors has only been studied to a limited extent. This study examines the large-scale consequences in the European Union of replacing 25–50% of animal-derived foods with plant-based foods on a dietary energy basis, assuming corresponding changes in production. It provides valuable insights to SDG target 2.3 to ensure sustainable food production systems by 2030, as well as SDG target 13.1 strengthening resilience and adapt to climate-related hazards.
In 2014, University College London and Elsevier established the UCL Big Data Institute, a collaboration to empower researchers to explore innovative ways to apply new technologies and analytics to scholarly content and data. The institute is co-staffed with UCL and Elsevier researchers and is based at Elsevier’s London Mendeleys headquarters. Projects include investigation of the role and impact of researchers in academic networks, citation models, adaptive user modeling, knowledge graphs and predictive modeling.

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