Responsible tourism

The main street in 1950s (left) and now (right).
Increasing attention has been given to historically and culturally significant traditional villages in China in the past five years. Rural tourism has been recognized as a key approach to rural development and poverty alleviation. This paper proposes an integrative and sustainable Rural Tourism-based Traditional Village Revitalization model to better understand the relationship between rural tourism and village revitalization, working towards SDG1 (no poverty).
This paper presents an intersectional analysis of the gender-water-tourism nexus. Based in an emergent tourism destination, Labuan Bajo, Indonesia, it goes beyond an analysis of how women bear the brunt of burdens related to water scarcity, and examines which women, why and how it affects their daily lives. This relates to SDG 5 Gender equality and SDG 6 clean water and sanitation.
Reed Exhibitions,

World Travel Market, Responsible Tourism Blog, June 2017

Tourism, decent work and the SDGs
Tourism and hospitality are labour intensive, with 8% of the global workforce employed in the sector. The critique of employment conditions in the sector is deeply rooted, low remuneration, anti-social hours, insecurity, limited access to training and poor career progression are charges regularly levelled at the industry. The World Responsible Tourism Awards showcases many examples of companies choosing to have inclusive labour practices.
Reed Exhibitions,

World Travel Market, Responsible Tourism Blog, June 2017

june-sdg-session-2016-hotels-sdgs-and-transparent-reporting
At the heart of Responsible Tourism are commitments to transparency and accountability. It is a process of addressing the sustainability issues which arise in a particular place and which the business can do something about, materiality matters. But it is not enough to focus only on the process, it is important to report the achievement. This blog explores reporting frameworks, rating initiatives, certification, recognition and showcases best practice.
Reed Exhibitions,

World Travel Market, Responsible Tourism Blog, May 2017

Ecotourism wildlife conservation and sdgs
The marketing value of the concept of ecotourism is now very low, as there is very little evidence that it delivers. Many people in the developing world are unable to visit National Parks and suffer only negative impacts – loss of access for meat, fruits, thatching grass and land for agriculture. How does a consumer or tour operator identify wildlife operators and conservancies that are really making a contribution? Either to wildlife and habitat conservation or to the livelihoods of local communities to ensure that they benefit from conservation?
Marine wildlife tourism (MWT) requires new approaches in its management frameworks. Several physiological and ecological impacts are shared across different MWT types. Successful cases can provide strategies to be applied to other MWT ventures. Scientific knowledge and adaptive management are essential to improve MWT. If well managed, MWT can be essential for species/habitat conservation and the achievement of SDG 14.