Climate change

Household methodologies (HHM) intervene directly in intra-household gender relations to strengthen overall smallholder agency and efficacy as economic agents and development actors. Strengthening women's agency is one mechanism for progressing towards collaborative, systemic farm management. It is expected this will contribute to improved farm resilience in the face of climate change, strengthen food and nutrition security, and improve other development indicators related to SDGs 2 and 5.
Elsevier,

World Development, Volume 101, January 2018, Pages 173-187

The Green Climate Fund (GCF) was set up in 2009 to help developing countries address climate change, however, it is confronted with the problem of insufficient financing. SDG 17 focuses on partnerships for the goals, which includes official development assistance. This paper explores several schemes for raising the public finance of the GCF among developed countries and therefore contributes to both goal 17 and 13.
Elsevier,

Sustainable Materials and Technologies, Volume 14, December 2017, Pages 1-10

Production wells in oil and gas industries are continually exposed to highly corrosive environments during stimulation treatments such as acidization. Acid treatment is used to increase rock permeability. However, these acids can be corrosive and the corrosive inhibitors that are added are environmentally damaging. This paper explores the research into corrosion inhibitors that are environmentally friendly, contributing to SDG 13.
An early warning scheme is proposed that runs ensembles of inferential models for predicting the cyanobacterial population dynamics and cyanotoxin concentrations in drinking water reservoirs. When the 10- to 30-day-ahead predicted concentrations of cyanobacteria cells or cyanotoxins exceed pre-defined limit values, an early warning automatically activates an action plan considering in-lake control. Implementing the proposed scheme for drinking water reservoirs enhances current water quality monitoring practices by solely utilising in situ monitoring data, in addition to cyanobacteria and cyanotoxin measurements. Access to routinely measured cyanotoxin data allows for development of models that predict explicitly cyanotoxin concentrations that avoid to inadvertently model and predict non-toxic cyanobacterial strains.
Two years on from what was a very optimistic COP 21 in Paris, the general sense of where we are now is less certain. While there is a lot still to be positive about – especially some renewable energy generating technologies becoming much cheaper, there is a different landscape with new geo-political challenges, not least the changing political Administration in the US. With these uncertainties as a backdrop to climate change in 2017, Elsevier has brought together 3 leading experts to help understand the challenges related to implementation of SDG 13 and where we should go from here. The speakers include Alice Larkin from the Tyndall Centre for Climate Change, Roland Roesch from IRENA and Jenny Heeter from NREL. These speakers provide some contemporary context around the themes that we should be aware of, including progress on the latest Carbon reduction targets; importance of innovation within renewable energy sector; and how policy has a vital role to play.
Elsevier,

Science Bulletin, Volume 61, Issue 23, December 2016, Pages 1833-1838

Future climate change is usually projected by coupled earth system models under specific emission scenarios designed by integrated assessment models (IAMs): this offline approach means there is no interaction between the coupled earth system models and the IAMs. This paper introduces a new method to design possible future emission scenarios and corresponding climate change, in which a simple economic and climate damage component is added to the coupled earth system model of Beijing Normal University (BNU-ESMs. Measuring future climate change is critical for reporting on progress on SDG 13 Climate action.
World Efficiency Solutions (WES) is the premier international meeting for the low-carbon and resource-efficient economy focussed on creating the low-carbon and resource-efficient market place. WES was first held in 2015 in Paris during COP21 negotiations, focusing on climate change solutions. World Efficiency develops a new environment consensus: economic and human activities must, to be sustainable, be redesigned to limit their impact on the environment while awareness of the planetary limits (climate change and resources scarcity) becomes widespread. A key objective for WES 2017 is to Identify new market opportunities aligned to the 2030 Sustainable Development Goals (estimated market opportunities are larger than USD 12 trillion) and the Paris Agreement on Climate Change from 2015.
World Future Energy Summit (WFES) is the world's foremost global annual event dedicated to advancing future energy, energy efficiency and clean technology. World Future Energy Summit continues to set the agenda for a global discussion on the future of renewable energy, clean technology and sustainability. A platform for governments, corporate decision-makers, investors, entrepreneurs and opinion makers, World Future Energy Summit is an annual meeting place that promotes dialogue, fosters knowledge transfer and accelerates strategic decision making in the pursuit of viable solutions to the world's growing energy challenges.
100% in 139 countries
For the world to reverse global warming, eliminate millions of annual air-pollution deaths, and provide secure energy, every country must have an energy roadmap based on widely available, reliable, zero-emission energy technologies. In support of SDG 7, this study presents such roadmaps for 139 countries of the world. These roadmaps are far more aggressive than what the Paris agreement calls for, but are still technically and economically feasible.
Researchers from George Washington University report on a low energy process that can capture and convert CO2 emissions into a material that is both useful and valuable: carbon nanotube wool. The research relates to the SDGs 12 responsible consumption and 13 climate action.

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