Gender equality and women's empowerment

Goal 5 target 5 is concerned with women’s full and effective participation and equal opportunities for leadership at all levels of decision-making in political, economic and public life. This study advances this target by studying gender diversity in medium to large organisations and asserts that diversity and equality management (DEM) systems are positively associated with performance and this relationship is moderated by lower to middle management gender diversity.
This study makes important links between SDG 2, SDG 5 and SDG 13 through its examination of how husbands and wives within the same household perceive climate risks and use group-based approaches as coping strategies. The findings indicate that options for adapting to climate change closely interplay with husbands' and wives' roles and responsibilities, social norms, risk perceptions and access to resources. A higher percentage of wives were found to adopt crop-related strategies, whereas husbands employ livestock- and agroforestry-related strategies.
Canadian farmer Kim Jo Bliss
This article is taken from the series "The View From Here", in which farming women from around the world give an insight into rural life. From the challenges of making an income to support the family and local economy to dealing with extreme weather and untamed lands, these women give their unique perspective on working in a male-dominated industry. It helps to highlight the importance of SDG 5, Gender equality.
SDG 5 aims to achieve gender equality and empower all women and girls. But how do you measure empowerment? In The Lancet Global Health, Fernanda Ewerling and colleagues use a set of questions from surveys routinely carried out in Africa to develop a survey-based women’s empowerment index (SWPER). The questions include whether a woman thinks being beaten by her husband is justified and who makes household decisions. The authors validate the index externally and demonstrate that it can be used to compare gender empowerment across African countries.
Reed Exhibitions,

World Travel Market, Responsible Tourism Blog, June 2017

Tourism, decent work and the SDGs
Tourism and hospitality are labour intensive, with 8% of the global workforce employed in the sector. The critique of employment conditions in the sector is deeply rooted, low remuneration, anti-social hours, insecurity, limited access to training and poor career progression are charges regularly levelled at the industry. The World Responsible Tourism Awards showcases many examples of companies choosing to have inclusive labour practices.
Participants of the GenderInSITE-Elsevier Foundation workshop in Buenos Aires (left to right): Louise Morley, María Bustelo, Eve Langelier, Judith Zubieta, Alice Abreu, Mary Murphy, Liisa Husu, Maxime Forest, Gloria Bonder, Rachel Palmen, Beatriz Macedo,
Gender InSITE is an international initiative to promote the role of women in science, innovation, technology and engineering - supporting the goal of SDG target 10, Reduced Inequalities. The Elsevier Foundation has been a long-time advisor and supporter of GenderInSITE, most recently providing a $40,000 grant for two thematic workshops in 2017: one addressing Latin America, exploring how a gender perspective in science education is indispensable to a sustainable development and the second in the South African region focusing on Gender and Innovation.
How to feed a population of 9bn in 2050? This was the question posed which provided the impetus for Elsevier to launch the bi-annual International Conference on Global Food Security Conference in 2013. Now in its 3rd year this highly regarded, research-led conference is focusing on five core conference themes to reflect an integrated approach to identifying solutions to the complex global challenge of food security: 1. Food creation 2. Food safety and bio security 3. Food loss and waste 4. Food in a changing society 5. Food utilization. Achieving global food security whilst reconciling demands on the environment is the greatest challenge faced by mankind. This directly supports SDG 2: to end hunger, achieve food security and improved nutrition and promote sustainable agriculture.
Elsevier,

Research Policy, Volume 46, Issue 5, June 2017, Pages 911-924

This paper looks at the gender gap in research evaluation, using detailed data on 180,000 research papers evaluated during the Italian national research assessment (VQR 2004–2010) conducted by the Agency for the Evaluation of Universities and Research Institutes (Anvur). The most important empirical finding is that there is a significant gender gap in research evaluation. This paper contributes in particular to SDG 5 and 9.
Elsevier,

Journal of Obstetric, Gynecologic & Neonatal Nursing, Volume 46, Issue 3, May–June 2017, Pages e56-e64

SDG 3 includes the target 3.1: is to reduce the global maternal mortality ratio to less than 70 per 100,000 live births by 2030. In this article, the authors describe the global factors that contribute to maternal mortality rates, outcomes of the implementation of the Millennium Development Goals, and the new, related Sustainable Development Goals. Implications for clinical practice, health care systems, research, and health policy are provided.
Elsevier,

The Lancet Planetary Health, Volume 1, Issue 2, May 2017, Pages e48-e49

This brief article presents a renewed and strengthened version of Kate Raworth’s well-known Doughnut model, which describes the social and ecological boundaries to human wellbeing. The model shows twelve dimensions and their illustrative indicators are derived from internationally agreed minimum standards for human wellbeing, and it relates to nearly all of the SDGs.

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