Sustainable cities and human settlements

All-Energy Australia is where the country’s clean energy industry meets over two inspiring days to access the latest, cutting-edge information. All-Energy Australia combines a free-to-attend, business-to-business, world-class multi-stream conference with an unrivaled professional development and networking forum alongside a comprehensive exhibition. Clean energy professionals and end-users benefit from unique access to a showcase of innovations in renewable energy including sustainable transport, solar technology, energy storage, energy efficiency and future grid.
All-Energy
All-Energy is the UK’s largest renewable energy event, providing industry suppliers and thought-leaders the opportunity to connect with new customers and expand business networks in this fast-changing marketplace as well as learn about latest technologies and solutions. Presentations from the 2017 event provide invaluable insights into bioenergy, solar, offshore and onshore wind, hydropower and wave & tidal sectors, as well as energy storage, low carbon transport and sustainable cities solutions. This is directly related to SDG 7: Affordable and clean energy.
Elsevier,

The Lancet Planetary Health, Volume 1, Issue 2, May 2017, Pages e48-e49

This brief article presents a renewed and strengthened version of Kate Raworth’s well-known Doughnut model, which describes the social and ecological boundaries to human wellbeing. The model shows twelve dimensions and their illustrative indicators are derived from internationally agreed minimum standards for human wellbeing, and it relates to nearly all of the SDGs.
Elsevier,

Sustainable Cities and Society, Volume 31, 2017, Pages 12-25

Urbanization is transforming human society in many ways. Besides all the obvious benefits, it also brings negative impacts such as the well-documented urban heat island (UHI) effect and the magnified human heat stress. One way to reduce human heat stress is to increase vegetation density in urban areas, because they can provide evatranspiration and shading benefits. This study investigated the impact of various trees on urban micrometeorological conditions in both open space and high density settings, and how they regulate outdoor thermal comfort contributing to SDGs 11 and 15. This study suggests that urban trees should be planted strategically to improve human thermal comfort as an integral part of all modern urban developments.
Urban water and energy systems have essential and multiple interlinkages that should be considered when assessing the effects of efficiency and sustainability measures. A prototype Reference Resource to Service System (RRSS) framework is used to represent the urban water-energy nexus and linked impacts of measures. Indicative analysis based on example data for New York City reveals large variability in multi-resource and climate mitigation benefits. This paper relates to SDG's 6,7 and 11.
This article adds a valuable perspective to SDG 11, by arguing that the rush for land due to urban demand must be considered in the debate on sustainable cities. The authors review debates on global land rush and the new urban agenda. Using cases where the global land rush and urbanization are simultaneously intensifying in the global South, the authors identify four areas that should be prioritized in current debates.
This article looks at technology and policy strategies that a community may adopt today, and uses backcasting to assess whether they will prove helpful to reach long-term sustainability goals, in support of SDG 11. Using a computational case study of London, the city's metabolism is modeled as the set of interacting, cross-sectoral (water, food, energy, waste) flows of carbon (C), nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), water, and energy. The paper proceeds to examine which businesses are currently marketing some of the identified key technological innovations
A number of property companies are going beyond traditional corporate responsibility to be net positive. Instead of opting for sustainability strategies that manage risk and reduce negative impacts, these companies are seeking to put back more into society, the environment and the global economy than they take out. Whilst the breadth and scope of these net positive commitments made by real estate leaders vary, there is enormous opportunity for this sector with sustainability and in supporting SDG 7 and 13.
The article summarises research conducted in different climate zones related to green roof design that is correlated with roles of substrate in promoting plant growth. From the review, it will serve as a guideline for selection of substrate suitable for green roofs in different climates worldwide. From the recommendation made, the success of plant growth in addressing food security needs a concerted effort worldwide through development of standard guidelines related to green roof design for close comparison across the world region. The review supports SDG 11: Sustainable cities and communities, SDG 17: Partnerships for the goals and SDG 13: Climate action.
Shakespeare’s allegory can be employed to articulate sustainable strategies in many of the SDG themes. For example, SDG 3 (Good health and well-being); SDG 7 (Affordable and clean energy); SDG 8 (Decent Work and economic growth); SDG 13 (Climate Action) and SDG 16 (Peace, Justice and Strong Institutions). This article examines how Shakespeare's works anticipate sustainability narratives for society at large and its individual actors.

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