Alzheimer's Disease

Elsevier, Journal for Nurse Practitioners, Volume 16, March 2020
Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder and a leading cause of dementia in the elderly. AD initially presents as mild cognitive impairment (MCI); later, as AD progresses, memory and cognition are destroyed, preventing the ability to carry out activities of daily living. The primary care provider may be the first to suspect MCI, and screening tests can help with diagnosis. Development of drugs for cognitive decline in AD has been slow; however new therapies are in the pipeline and discovery of biomarkers make early diagnosis and future treatment of AD hopeful.
Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by progressive decline in cognitive function. Intracerebroventricular injection of streptozotocin (icv-STZ) has been used as an experimental model of Sporadic AD (SAD) in rodents and represents a promising tool for etiopathogenic analysis and evaluation of new therapeutic proposals for AD. The icv-STZ model shows many aspects of SAD abnormalities, resulting in decreased brain glucose and energy metabolism, cognitive impairment, oxidative stress, neuronal loss, and amyloid angiopathy.
Elsevier, Archives of Gerontology and Geriatrics, Volume 86, January - February 2020
We investigated emotional regulation of autobiographical memories in Alzheimer's disease (AD). AD patients and control participants were asked to retrieve memories in response to “happy” and “sad” cues. Participants were also asked to rate the emotional valence of memories at retrieval as well as at the moment the events were encoded. Results showed that both control participants and AD patients rated memories cued by “happy” as more positive when retrieved than when encoded.
Elsevier, Journal of Neuroscience Methods, Volume 327, 1 November 2019
Background: Compared to previous neuropsychological investigations with standard paper-pen tests limited to test complex spatial learning and memory processes, 3-D virtual immersive technology might offer new tools for research purposes and for diagnosis in patients suffering from mild cognitive impairment or dementia. Comparison with existing methods: Current software proposes a customizable VR environment combined with an analyser module based on regions of interest and some parameters of analysis or pre-calibrated VR mazes with raw data.
Elsevier, Pharmacology Biochemistry and Behavior, Volume 184, September 2019
Background: Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common neurodegenerative disease causing dementia in the elderly population. Due to the fact that there is still no cure for Alzheimer's dementia and available treatment strategies bring only symptomatic benefits, there is a pressing demand for other effective strategies such as diet. Since the inflammation hypothesis gained considerable significance in the AD pathogenesis, elucidating the modulatory role of dietary factors on inflammation may help to prevent, delay the onset and slow the progression of AD.
Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is one the most common human afflictions, contributing to long-term disability in survivors. Emerging data indicate that functional improvement or deterioration can occur years after TBI. In this regard, TBI is recognized as risk factor for late-life neurodegenerative disorders. TBI encompasses a heterogeneous disease process in which diverse injury subtypes and multiple molecular mechanisms overlap.
Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia and it is characterized by the deposition of amyloid-β (Aβ) plaques and neurofibrillary tangles in the brain. However, the complete pathogenesis of the disease is still unknown. High level of serum cholesterol has been found to positively correlate with an increased risk of dementia and some studies have reported a decreased prevalence of AD in patients taking cholesterol-lowering drugs.
Background: Memory for music has attracted much recent interest in Alzheimer's disease but the underlying brain mechanisms have not been defined in patients directly. Here we addressed this issue in an Alzheimer's disease cohort using activation fMRI of two core musical memory systems. Methods: We studied 34 patients with younger onset Alzheimer's disease led either by episodic memory decline (typical Alzheimer's disease)or by visuospatial impairment (posterior cortical atrophy)in relation to 19 age-matched healthy individuals.
Alzheimer's disease (AD) is considered a polygenic disorder. This view is clouded, however, by lingering uncertainty over how to treat the quasi “monogenic” role of apolipoprotein E (APOE). The APOE4 allele is not only the strongest genetic risk factor for AD, it also affects risk for cardiovascular disease, stroke, and other neurodegenerative disorders. This review, based mostly on data from human studies, ranges across a variety of APOE-related pathologies, touching on evolutionary genetics and risk mitigation by ethnicity and sex.
Microglia are the predominant immune cells of the central nervous system (CNS) that exert key physiological roles required for maintaining CNS homeostasis, notably in response to chronic stress, as well as mediating synaptic plasticity, learning and memory. The repeated exposure to stress confers a higher risk of developing neurodegenerative diseases including sporadic Alzheimer's disease (AD).

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