Awareness

Elsevier, International Journal of Women's Dermatology, Volume 7, December 2021
Photograph of an example of a tattoo on a human trafficking survivor
Human-trafficking survivors suffer significant physical, mental, and social health consequences, prompting them to seek health care services. Although there is research regarding identification protocols for human-trafficking victims, there is no framework outlining the dermatologic patterns of survivors of human trafficking. We sought to identify the dermatologic signs reported in human-trafficking victims to create a framework for dermatologists and the broader medical community to appropriately screen patients at risk.
Disruptions to cancer screening services have been experienced in most settings as a consequence of the COVID-19 pandemic. Ideally, programmes would resolve backlogs by temporarily expanding capacity; however, in practice, this is often not possible. We aim to inform the deliberations of decision makers in high-income settings regarding their cervical cancer screening policy response. We caution against performance measures that rely solely on restoring testing volumes to pre-pandemic levels because they will be less effective at mitigating excess cancer diagnoses than will targeted measures.
Disruptions to cancer screening services have been experienced in most settings as a consequence of the COVID-19 pandemic. Ideally, programmes would resolve backlogs by temporarily expanding capacity; however, in practice, this is often not possible. We aim to inform the deliberations of decision makers in high-income settings regarding their cervical cancer screening policy response. We caution against performance measures that rely solely on restoring testing volumes to pre-pandemic levels because they will be less effective at mitigating excess cancer diagnoses than will targeted measures.
This Comment supports SDGs 3 and 10 by highlighting the need to centre race in the work of the global health community. The authors call on colleagues to meaningully engage with critical race theory, a transdisciplinary intellectual movement to understand and disrupt systemic racism.
The victimization of women by opportunistic drug-facilitated sexual assault in leisure contexts was studied in this work by applying a novel approximation. A multifocal analytical strategy based on an intersectional gender-sensitive approach was used to analyse the evidence coming from both forensic case studies and contextual studies about sexual interrelation and drug use. The process of victimization comprises social changes affecting consumption patterns and sexual interaction, intersecting in the hegemonic recreational nightlife model.
Despite a global understanding that indicators and outcomes of cardiovascular disease (CVD) are known to differ between men and women, uptake of the recognition of sex and gender influences on the clinical care of women has been slow or absent. The Canadian Women's Heart Health Alliance (CWHHA) was established as a network of experts and advocates to develop and disseminate evidence-informed strategies to transform clinical practice and augment collaborative action on women's cardiovascular health in Canada.
Background: In the context of the Sustainable Development Goals and the shifting global burden of disease, this systematic review analyses the evidence from rigorously evaluated programmes that seek to transform the gendered social norms undermining the health and wellbeing of children, adolescents, and young adults.
Elsevier, Journal of Clinical and Translational Endocrinology, Volume 15, March 2019
Background: The International Diabetes Federation (IDF) launched the Kids and Diabetes in School (KiDS) project in collaboration with the International Society for Paediatric and Adolescent Diabetes (ISPAD) and Sanofi Diabetes to inform and teach school staff, children and parents on the management of diabetes in school. Brazil and India were chosen as pilot countries. Methods: The evaluation was conducted using a qualitative methodology using semi-structured face to face in-depth interviews.
In August 2018, the president of the World Bank noted that “‘Human capital’—the potential of individuals—is going to be the most important long-term investment any country can make for its people's future prosperity and quality of life”. Nevertheless, leaders and practitioners in academic science and medicine continue to be unaware of and poorly educated about the nature, extent, and impact of barriers to full participation of women and minorities in science and medicine around the world.

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