Bioturbation

This research examines high-elevation biocrusts on volcanic tephra in Haleakalā Crater, Maui, Hawai′i; geomorphic, ecological, and pedological processes are discussed, in order to provide an integrated geoecological view of linkages that have influenced biocrust genesis. The study considers four spatial scales: (i) the landscape scale; (ii) the site scale; (iii) the miniature scale and, (iv) the microscopic scale.
It is commonly acknowledged that ants improve the hydraulic properties of soils in which they build their nests. To date, however, most studies of such soil modifications have focused on one ant species and one type of ecosystem, rather than investigating how different ant species affect different types of land cover within the same landscape. Our study focused on modifications to water infiltration and surface texture of Haplic Luvisols by two ant species—one of them present only in a forest and the other present only in a pasture.