COVID-19

The ongoing novel coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic has highlighted the need for individuals to have easy access to healthcare facilities for treatment as well as vaccinations. The surge in COVID-19 hospitalizations during 2020 also underscored the fact that accessibility to nearby hospitals for testing, treatment and vaccination sites is crucial for patients with fever or respiratory symptoms. Although necessary, quantifying healthcare access is challenging as it depends on a complex interaction between underlying socioeconomic and physical factors.
Elsevier, Transportation Research Interdisciplinary Perspectives, Volume 13, March 2022
Telecommuting has become a dominant professional experience for many Canadian business and workers due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Telecommuting has several benefits that are separate from COVID-19. Two prevalent changes have been in regard to telecommuting and online food buying habits, both of which impact social wellbeing as a dimension of social sustainability. We discuss two exploratory surveys on the perception of telecommuting and food e-commerce.
Much research has been devoted to assessing the effect of commute duration on the subjective well-being of people, but as of yet, the respective body or research has been inconclusive as to whether there is indeed a (large) negative effect or not. To control the spread of COVID-19 governments around the world have taken unprecedented measures to control the outbreak of the Corona-virus. Forcing or strongly advising people to work from home (i.e. at least those who can) is often one of these.
This Article supports SDGs 3 and 10 by assessing SARS-CoV-2 incidence in six ethnic groups in Amsterdam, and showing that incidence was highest in the largest minority ethnic groups. The findings suggest that prevention measures and vaccination should be especially encouraged in these groups.
Purpose: In this study, we identify and characterise how organisations have responded, in ways ranging from restoration to radical change, to discontinuities in their product-based service (PBS) supply chains during the COVID-19 pandemic.
Latin America has been particularly hard hit by the COVID-19 syndemic, including the associated economic fallout that has threatened the livelihoods of most families. Social protection platforms and policies should have a crucial role in safeguarding individual and family wellbeing; however, the response has been insufficient to address the scale of the crisis.
From the more than 700,000 deaths from COVID-19 in the US and the nearly 5 million worldwide, there emerge even more stories than match the statistics when one considers all of the patients' relations. While the numbers are staggering, when we humanize the stories, we are left with even greater devastation, of course. One of the stories among so many that seemed particularly salient and poignant to us was the death of Dr. Susan Moore.
Elsevier, Clinical Epidemiology and Global Health, Volume 13, 1 January 2022
Background: India has a high COVID-19 burden. The Indian government responded to the pandemic by mandating its population to adhere to certain Protective Measures (PMs). Compliance to these PMs depends on their acceptability and adaptability among the general public. Aims: To explore the perceptions and practices of COVID-19 related PMs among the general public of North India. Methods: Qualitative study in four administrative districts (Lucknow, Etawah, Patna and Darbhanga) of North India. Two urban and two rural districts were purposefully selected.
The COVID-19 pandemic is unprecedented. The pandemic not only induced a public health crisis, but has led to severe economic, social, and educational crises. Across economies and societies, the distributional consequences of the pandemic have been uneven. Among groups living in vulnerable conditions, the pandemic substantially magnified the inequality gaps, with possible negative implications for these individuals' long-term physical, socioeconomic, and mental wellbeing.
Elsevier, Current Opinion in Chemical Biology, Volume 65, December 2021
Drug repurposing aims to find new uses for already existing and approved drugs. We now provide a brief overview of recent developments in drug repurposing using machine learning alongside other computational approaches for comparison. We also highlight several applications for cancer using kinase inhibitors, Alzheimer's disease as well as COVID-19.

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