Ethnic Groups

Background: The population of older adults (ie, those aged ≥55 years) in England is becoming increasingly ethnically diverse. Previous reports indicate that ethnic inequalities in health exist among older adults, but information is limited by the paucity of data from small minority ethnic groups. This study aimed to analyse inequalities in health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and five determinants of health in older adults across all ethnic groups in England.
Elsevier,

The Lancet Digital Health, Volume 3, March 2021

This Comment supports SDGs 3 and 10 by highlighting the role of data scientists in challenging racism and discrimination. The Comment highlights how structural inequalities in society are easily encoded in datasets and in the application of data science, which can reinforce existing injustices.
This Article supports SDGs 3 and 10 by evaluating ethnic inequalities in health among older adults (55 years or older) in England. The large, cross-sectional study includes more than a million survey respondents, and identifies wide ethnic inequalities in health-related quality of life, prevalence of long-term conditions, experiences of primary care, support from local services, and confidence in managing one's own health. Outcomes varied widely between minority ethnic groups, both in the direction and magnitude of associations.
It is estimated that 32.5 million US adults have clinical osteoarthritis (OA), with the most common sites being knee and hip. OA is associated with substantial individual and societal costs. Race/ethnicity, socioeconomic status (SES), and geographic variations in the prevalence of knee and hip OA are well established around the world. In addition, clinical outcomes associated with hip and knee OA differ according to race/ethnicity, SES, and geography. This variation is likely multifactorial and may also reflect country-specific differences in health care systems.
Elsevier, Journal of the American Medical Directors Association, Volume , 2021
Objective: Health disparities are pervasive in nursing homes (NHs), but disparities in NH end-of-life (EOL) care (ie, hospital transfers, place of death, hospice use, palliative care, advance care planning) have not been comprehensively synthesized. We aim to identify differences in NH EOL care for racial/ethnic minority residents. Design: A systematic review guided by the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses and registered in PROSPERO (CRD42020181792).
This study supports SDG 3 and 10 by showing increased mortality due to COVID-19 in Brazil’s mixed ethnicity and Black populations and regions with lower levels of socioeconomic development, highlighting the need to better protect these vulnerable groups from the adverse effects of the COVID-19 pandemic.
Background: Few population-based studies have examined the association between disability and personal wellbeing (PWB) among working-age adults. Objective/Hypothesis: To determine: (1) the magnitude of differences in wellbeing between working-age adults with and without disability in contemporary samples representative of the UK population; and (2) whether the size of any observed differences between people with and without disability is moderated by age, gender, ethnicity, partnership status, educational attainment or employment status.
This study supports SDG 3 and 10 by analysing data from 415 ethnic groups in 36 low-income and middle-income countries, and showing substantial ethnic disparities in under-5 mortality across the countries studied. These findings are crucial for monitoring trends and examining the impact of health interventions on child survival across different ethnic groups.
Study objective: We examine racial and ethnic differences in opioid prescribing and dosing for long bone fractures at emergency department (ED) discharge. Methods: We conducted an electronic health records–based cross-sectional study of adults with long bone fractures who presented to the ED across 22 sites from a health care delivery system (2016 to 2017).

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