Advancing SDG 1 no poverty and SDG 8 decent work and economic growth, this study examines trauma theory in the context of family separation due to Filipino labour migration. The experiences documented build a larger global vision of the misery of long-term family separation and prolonged labour migration experienced by Filipino labour migrants around the world.
Elsevier,

Research in Economics, Volume 71, Issue 2, June 2017, Pages 306-336.

Contributing to SDGs 1 (No Poverty) and 8 (Decent Work and Economic Growth), this Elsevier Atlas Award winning study examines trends between developing countries, economic growth and poverty levels.
Field trial visit to the Center of Excellence for Rice in Malaysia, left to right: Shahrizal Abdul, Rob van Daalen, Raudhah Talib, Dr. Suzana Yusup, Noor Hafizah Ramli and Abu Bakar Ahmad.
The winner of the first ever Green and Sustainable Chemistry Challenge, Dr Suzana Yusup, invited Rob van Daalen (publisher Chemistry and initiator of the Challenge) to make a site visit to see the progress of her project "Biopesticide for Improvement of Paddy Yield". The visit made clear that the Elsevier sustainability program and specifically this challenge have a positive impact on health, environment and society in local communities in Malaysia, enhancing efforts to advance SDGs 1, 6, 12 and 15.
This article addresses the health needs of slum residents, who are at an increased risk of developing mental health problems, non-communicable diseases, malnutrition, infectious diseases, and injuries due to violence. Children are especially vulnerable, as malnutrition can lead to stunted growth and impaired cognitive development. Slum health is under-represented in the scientific literature, despite an estimated doubling of slum populations by 2030, from today’s figure of 1 billion. Addressing the health-care needs of people living in slums will be vital to achieving SDG 3 and is related to SDG 1.
This chapter explores how five business leadership qualities can advance SDG 1 on no poverty. All companies are linked to global poverty, particularly through their supply chains, and have a responsibility to work towards eliminating negative impacts to the Goal.
A farmer in Uganda
Lucy Ajok, a 34 year old Ugandan farmer, gives Farmers Weekly an insight into her rural life. Lucy is a single mother of five children and lives on a three-acre farm practising mixed farming. Farming families dependent on family labour, like Lucy's, are typically the poorest in Uganda, and often have the additional challenge of HIV. This interview shares some of the challenges faced in achieving SDG 1 and SDG 2.
According to a Joseph Rowntree Foundation report, responding to poverty-related problems accounts for almost 60% of council spending on children's services in England. This article highlights the financial impact of poverty on public spending in England. Issues related to poverty and inequality are prevalent globally: all countries must tackle SDG 1 and SDG 10.
Elsevier,

Chem, Volume 1, Issue 1, 7 July 2016, Pages 10-12

Paul Anastas and Julie Zimmerman highlight the vital role chemistry must play in creating a sustainable future. The article provides a robust definition for green chemistry and examines the role of green chemistry in supporting the SDGs, with a particular focus on the goals addressing water, poverty and food: SDGs 1, 2, 6 and 12.
Elsevier,

The Economics and Organization of Brazilian Agriculture, Chapter 6, 2016, Pages 147–158

Agricultural development is critical to the advancement of Goal 2 (zero hunger). This concluding chapter summarises the roles of entrepreneurship and value chain organization in agricultural development in Brazil.
A study of the Massive Food Production Programme (MFPP) in South Africa shows that a focus on raising maize yields in small-scale farming environments did not result in a marked improvement in rural poverty or food security. This article presents results from a study of the MFPP in three villages in the Eastern Cape Province in South Africa. This article highlights the interconnection between SDG 1 - No Poverty and SDG 2 - Zero hunger and points to ways in which improvements in agriculture could have benefits on the livelihoods of the poorest small holder farmers.

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