Bangladesh is one of the world's most vulnerable countries to climate change. This study combines environmental and human elements to assess socio-environmental outcomes. It examines the implications of climate change on poor communities dependent on fishing for their livelihoods, exploring the interconnectedness of SDG's 1,2, 14 and how they will be impacted by SDG 13.
Advancing SDG 1 no poverty and SDG 8 decent work and economic growth, this study examines trauma theory in the context of family separation due to Filipino labour migration. The experiences documented build a larger global vision of the misery of long-term family separation and prolonged labour migration experienced by Filipino labour migrants around the world.
This article addresses the health needs of slum residents, who are at an increased risk of developing mental health problems, non-communicable diseases, malnutrition, infectious diseases, and injuries due to violence. Children are especially vulnerable, as malnutrition can lead to stunted growth and impaired cognitive development. Slum health is under-represented in the scientific literature, despite an estimated doubling of slum populations by 2030, from today’s figure of 1 billion. Addressing the health-care needs of people living in slums will be vital to achieving SDG 3 and is related to SDG 1.
Elsevier,

Chem, Volume 1, Issue 1, 7 July 2016, Pages 10-12

Paul Anastas and Julie Zimmerman highlight the vital role chemistry must play in creating a sustainable future. The article provides a robust definition for green chemistry and examines the role of green chemistry in supporting the SDGs, with a particular focus on the goals addressing water, poverty and food: SDGs 1, 2, 6 and 12.
A study of the Massive Food Production Programme (MFPP) in South Africa shows that a focus on raising maize yields in small-scale farming environments did not result in a marked improvement in rural poverty or food security. This article presents results from a study of the MFPP in three villages in the Eastern Cape Province in South Africa. This article highlights the interconnection between SDG 1 - No Poverty and SDG 2 - Zero hunger and points to ways in which improvements in agriculture could have benefits on the livelihoods of the poorest small holder farmers.
Elsevier,

Social Science & Medicine, March 2015, Pages 316 - 326

The evidence that large income differences have damaging health and social consequences is strong and in most countries inequality is increasing. Narrowing the gap will improve the health and wellbeing of populations and contribute to the advancement of SDG 10.2 by empowering and promoting the social, economic and political inclusion of all.
Elsevier,

World Development, February 2015, Pages 707 - 718

Are NGOs able to meet long-term transformative goals in their work for development and social justice? Given their weak roots in civil society and the rising tide of technocracy that has swept through the world of foreign aid, most NGOs remain poorly placed to influence the drivers of social change. By applying their knowledge of local contexts to strengthen their roles in empowerment and social transformation, they have the ability to advance SDG target 16.7 to ensure responsive, inclusive, participatory and representative decision-making at all levels.
Elsevier,

World Development: Volume 66, February 2015, Pages 400-412

SDG 1 No Poverty and SDG 2 Zero Hunger are addressed in this article which provides, an analysis of the sustainability standards Fairtrade, Organic, and UTZ and their impact specifically on smallholder coffee farmers in Uganda. Only Fairtrade was found to have a positive effect on poverty. Poor African smallholders were found to be able to participate in high-value markets, but more research is needed in order to understand how standards and certification schemes can benefit developing countries better.
Research since 2000 has clearly shown the links between transport disadvantage, poverty, and economic and social exclusion. This paper reflects on the extent to which a social exclusion approach to research on transport disadvantage has been successful in opening up new avenues of research enquiry and/or identifying new theoretical perspectives and/or methodological approaches. It aligns with and shows the connections between SDGs 1, 10 and 11.

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