Elsevier,

Sustainable Materials and Technologies, Volume 13, 2017, Pages 18-23

In science and engineering, sustainable nanotechnology is successful in giving solutions for the challenges in various sectors such as medicine, catalysis, industrial and agricultural activities.Due to the growing demand of nanoparticles, it is essential to build up synthetic methods which are profitable, environmentally sustainable and which can substitute with effective and competent technology to synthesis environmentally benign nanoparticles (NPs). Nanomaterials are “deliberately engineered” to direct the enhancement of special properties at the nanoscale. Nanoparticles have been known to be used for abundant physical, biological, and pharmaceutical applications. Nano-silver is the most studied and utilized nanoparticle. This review presents various synthesis methods of silver nanoparticles (AgNPAgNPs) and their application in different sectors.
This papers examines sustainable tourism in a United Nations biosphere reserve, advancing the knowledge on SDG 12 target B. It uses critical discourse analysis to understand active stakeholder perspectives and shows that understanding power and ideology is fundamental to sustainable tourism. This paper adds to the literature on stakeholder analysis in tourism specifically and also has wider implications for sustainable development more generally.
Elsevier,

Sustainable Materials and Technologies, Volume 12, 2017, Pages 1-8

This article examines the supply risk and environmental aspects of resource utilization. The whole of raw materials goes hand in hand with significant supply risks and environmental impacts. This article therefore contributes to goal 12 (sustainable consumption and production) and goal 9 (industry, innovation and infrastructure).
Elsevier,

Sustainable Materials and Technologies, Volume 12, July 2017, Pages 1-8

Advancing goals 9 and 12, this paper describes a guideline for material scientists to implement resource strategy considerations in basic research of the development of functional materials. Such considerations will, in turn, help to identify promising sustainable materials, improving the resource efficiency to an enhanced sustainable circular economy.
Elsevier,

Current Opinion in Environmental Sustainability, Volumes 26–27, June 2017, Pages 77-83

Spatial distribution of deforestation observed in 1988–2004 and 2005–2014, including the main territorial units (agrarian settlements) created prior to 2004 and subsequently, along with key transportation infrastructure (paved roads and ports).
In the Brazilian Amazon, environmental considerations have not been adequately incorporated into long-term land use planning and this failure has partly been due to the complexities of the country’s existing inter-sectorial institutional arrangements. The authors point out the major challenges for the balance between of use of natural resources under a capital-driven agenda and the needs and aspirations of large and widely distributed populations throughout the Amazon region, which could have an important role in sustainability. This article demonstrates the multidiscilpinary nature of the SDGs by exploring the interconnectedness of economic development and environmental concerns.
It is no secret to anyone living in Beirut or a similar modern city in a semi-arid tropical country in the summer that their home has become a concrete forest and an urban heat island. Old wood or stone houses and their gardens have been replaced by concrete towers and parking lots, in the name of development. The result is searing summer nights, a drastic loss of insect and avian biodiversity, and a large increase in energy usage for interior climate control. These problems are experienced in rapidly developing urban centers worldwide. Moreover, cities worldwide are struggling with waste disposal. Roof gardens can help solve both problems highlighting synergies with a number of SDGs, including 7 and 11.
This article serves to support SDG 14 (life below water) and SDG 12 (responsible consumption and production). Current international strategies and policies to reduce single-use plastics (plastic bags and microbeads) are reviewed.
Using newly-released and globally available high-resolution remote sensing data on forest loss, the authors update the assessment of the cross-country determinants of deforestation in developing countries. Agricultural trade, relatively neglected to date, is found to be one of the main factors causing deforestation. Insights into the relationship between the levels of forestation and trade are vital for understanding how to address SDG 15.2 to promote the implementation of sustainable management of all types of forests.
Elsevier,

Materials Today, Volume 20, Issue 2, 2017, Pages 67-73

In 2013 alone nearly 50 million tons of e-waste was generated worldwide. The United Nations’ STEP initiative has reported that e-waste is expected to grow by 33% over the next 4 years and by 2030 obsolete computer waste will reach 1,000 million tons. This electronic waste often contain toxic substances and nearly 80–85% of electronic products are directly disposed of in landfills or incinerators. The researchers suggest a new technique where circuit boards from electronics can be crushed into nanodust by a cryo-mill. The dust can then be easily separated into its component elements for recycling. The researchers intend it to replace the current process of e-waste into landfills and advances SDG 12.
This is a timely article with potential to tackle multiple fronts of sustainable development with regards to agricultural intensification and green revolution which are currently taking precedence in most developing countries as a means of boosting productivity and ensuring food security. Given the high dependence of the modern global food production system on the continuous supply of commercial phosphorus (P) fertilizers, this study presents a detailed, methodical, and up to date assessment of the key sustainability challenges for the global P resource, and highlights their implications for global food security. This article addresses SDG 2; SDG 12; SDG 14 and SDG 15.

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