Elsevier,

Science Bulletin, Volume 61, Issue 23, December 2016, Pages 1833-1838

Future climate change is usually projected by coupled earth system models under specific emission scenarios designed by integrated assessment models (IAMs): this offline approach means there is no interaction between the coupled earth system models and the IAMs. This paper introduces a new method to design possible future emission scenarios and corresponding climate change, in which a simple economic and climate damage component is added to the coupled earth system model of Beijing Normal University (BNU-ESMs. Measuring future climate change is critical for reporting on progress on SDG 13 Climate action.
Low carbon investments in urban areas offer additional benefits (health and jobs). This article examines the co-benefits of low carbon investments in three 3 projects in different cities, addressing SDG 11 (sustainable cities and communities) and SDG 13 (climate action).
SDG resources - poster

The Blueprint for Business Leadership on the SDGs aims to inspire all business to take leading action in support of the achievement of all Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

Researchers from George Washington University report on a low energy process that can capture and convert CO2 emissions into a material that is both useful and valuable: carbon nanotube wool. The research relates to the SDGs 12 responsible consumption and 13 climate action.
Elsevier,

Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Volume 76, September 2017, Pages 72-80

Under SDG 7, there are targets to increase renewable energy sources that include biomass, hydroelectric, wind, solar and hydrothermal systems, are carbon-neutral, releasing relatively no emissions. This paper discusses the initiatives associated with the provision of renewable energy to the energy mix in Nigeria as an indication of the country’s commitment to adopt a sustainable development strategy in shaping the economy. The paper identifies social and political obstacles as the most significant roadblocks towards rapid implementation of a green economy through the deployment of renewable energy for sustainable development.
Bangladesh is one of the world's most vulnerable countries to climate change. This study combines environmental and human elements to assess socio-environmental outcomes. It examines the implications of climate change on poor communities dependent on fishing for their livelihoods, exploring the interconnectedness of SDG's 1,2, 14 and how they will be impacted by SDG 13.
Elsevier,

Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Volume 75, August 2017, Pages 393–401

This article discusses how the SDGs can be used to motivate investments in Renewable Energy (RE) in Africa. Using the SDGs as a benchmark for inclusive and sustainable growth the synergy effects provided by RE are identified and an analysis of possible leverage points, available instruments and involved actors shows that there remains a large additional potential. The authors argue that expansion of Renewable Energy supports the fulfillment of at least 10 of the 17 SDGs.
This study makes important links between SDG 2, SDG 5 and SDG 13 through its examination of how husbands and wives within the same household perceive climate risks and use group-based approaches as coping strategies. The findings indicate that options for adapting to climate change closely interplay with husbands' and wives' roles and responsibilities, social norms, risk perceptions and access to resources. A higher percentage of wives were found to adopt crop-related strategies, whereas husbands employ livestock- and agroforestry-related strategies.
The Consolidated Versions of the Treaty on European Union and the Treaty on the Functioning of the Eu-ropean Union (the EU Treaties) set out the constitutional framework for the EU. The Treaties do not attempt to define sustainable development or impose an EU-wide adoption of a common definition. This practice note sets out the approach to sustainable development at the EU institutional level. This has an impact on all SDGs but in particular, SDGs 9, 10 and 13.
UK mechanisms touching on sustainable development are generally based on, and have as their over-arching objective, some variation of the so-called “Brundtland definition”. These mechanisms also widely reference the three interconnected ‘pillars’ of sustainable development, also known as the ‘triple bottom line’ of sustainable development. The UK approach has a bearing on all SDGs and in particular, SDGs 9, 10 and 13.

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