This study makes important links between SDG 2, SDG 5 and SDG 13 through its examination of how husbands and wives within the same household perceive climate risks and use group-based approaches as coping strategies. The findings indicate that options for adapting to climate change closely interplay with husbands' and wives' roles and responsibilities, social norms, risk perceptions and access to resources. A higher percentage of wives were found to adopt crop-related strategies, whereas husbands employ livestock- and agroforestry-related strategies.
The Consolidated Versions of the Treaty on European Union and the Treaty on the Functioning of the Eu-ropean Union (the EU Treaties) set out the constitutional framework for the EU. The Treaties do not attempt to define sustainable development or impose an EU-wide adoption of a common definition. This practice note sets out the approach to sustainable development at the EU institutional level. This has an impact on all SDGs but in particular, SDGs 9, 10 and 13.
UK mechanisms touching on sustainable development are generally based on, and have as their over-arching objective, some variation of the so-called “Brundtland definition”. These mechanisms also widely reference the three interconnected ‘pillars’ of sustainable development, also known as the ‘triple bottom line’ of sustainable development. The UK approach has a bearing on all SDGs and in particular, SDGs 9, 10 and 13.
Climate services for health is an emerging discipline aiming to help health professionals better understand the effect of climate and weather conditions on health, and ultimately, to anticipate disease risk consequent upon climate change. This article shows the connections of goal 3 (good health and wellbeing) and goal 13 (climate action) in its application of climate services for health to dengue fever.
It is no secret to anyone living in Beirut or a similar modern city in a semi-arid tropical country in the summer that their home has become a concrete forest and an urban heat island. Old wood or stone houses and their gardens have been replaced by concrete towers and parking lots, in the name of development. The result is searing summer nights, a drastic loss of insect and avian biodiversity, and a large increase in energy usage for interior climate control. These problems are experienced in rapidly developing urban centers worldwide. Moreover, cities worldwide are struggling with waste disposal. Roof gardens can help solve both problems highlighting synergies with a number of SDGs, including 7 and 11.
This collection of articles from the Editors of Environment International Journal explore the impact of climate change on health. The collection demonstrates the interconnectedness of SDG 13 and SDG 3. Understanding the changes and associated impact allows us to develop appropriate adaptive policies and practices to respond to climate-sensitive health risks.
Elsevier,

Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Volume 71, 2017, Pages 12-28, ISSN 1364-0321

The article supports SDG 7: Affordable and Clean Energy. It analyses the top 5 emerging renewable energies which include marine energy, concentrated solar photovoltaics, enhanced geothermal energy, cellulosic ethanol and artificial photosynthesis. This supports the SDG 7 goal to ensure access to affordable, reliable, sustainable and modern energy for all. The article also highlights the economic aspects, giving insights on the development and scope of CO2 mitigation for renewable, clean and sustainable developments that supports SDG 13 that covers action to combat climate change and its impacts by utilization of renewable energy.
Elsevier,

Energy Policy, Volume 104, May 2017, Pages 431-438

Strong discrepancy between ideal and actual climate policy explained by incentives of policy-makers. The Paris Agreement allows for a greater emphasis on national climate policies. Shifting priorities and maturing bureaucracies allows climate policies to focus on greenhouse gas emission reduction. working towards SDG 13.
This articles addresses SDG 17 - Partnerships for the SDG's. It highlights the needs of joint involvement of various sectors, using as an example The Converging World (TCW) partnership model which currently links south-west England and Tamil Nadu, raising funds for wind turbines in India to avert emissions from conventional sources and reinvesting operating surpluses into forest restoration. In this case the developing-developed world partnership offers equal opportunities in addressing the Climate Action element of SDG 13, serving as an example of positive partnerships in fulfilling the SDGs.
Using newly-released and globally available high-resolution remote sensing data on forest loss, the authors update the assessment of the cross-country determinants of deforestation in developing countries. Agricultural trade, relatively neglected to date, is found to be one of the main factors causing deforestation. Insights into the relationship between the levels of forestation and trade are vital for understanding how to address SDG 15.2 to promote the implementation of sustainable management of all types of forests.

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