Elsevier, Transportation Research Part D: Transport and Environment, Volume 103, February 2022
Efficiency, consistency and sufficiency as complementary strategies for sustainable mobility.
Transport justice has two essential dimensions: (1) compensating for inequalities in access to mobility, and (2) mitigating the disproportionately burdensome negative consequences of transport.

Small island developing states face challenges in cultivating healthy food systems and are currently bearing substantial burdens of obesity and type 2 diabetes.

Links to SDG6 and the theme of WWD as it covers the presence of emerging pollutants in aquatic systems such as rivers, lakes, groundwater, glaciers, wetlands, the ocean poses significant risks to human and environmental health.
Mobility as a Service (MaaS) is a recent concept that is gaining momentum in both the scientific world and the private sector.
Background: Climate change and air pollution are two major societal problems. Their complex interplay calls for an advanced evaluation framework that can support decision making.
Mitigating and adapting to climate change requires decarbonizing electricity while ensuring resilience of supply, since a warming planet will lead to greater extremes in weather and, plausibly, in pow
Wildfire is one of the most critical natural disasters that threaten wildlands and forest resources.
Fruits and vegetables are responsible for about 22% of food losses and wastes along the supply chain (not including the retail level).
Proteins serve as an imperative macronutrient in human nutrition and well-being.
As evidence of the health impacts of transportation investments has grown, planners have increasingly used health impact assessments (HIAs) to evaluate transportation plans, projects, and policies.

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