This paper analyzes the impact of data gap in Millennium Development Goals’ (MDGs) performance indicators on actual performance success of MDGs. It underlines the need to strengthen the performance measurement system attached to the 2030 agenda for sustainable development and the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). In particular it is relevant to SDG 9 Industry, Innovation and Infrastructure, SDG 16 Peace, Justice and Strong Institutions and SDG 17 Partnership for the Goals.
Elsevier,

The Lancet Planetary Health, Volume 1, Issue 2, May 2017, Pages e48-e49

This brief article presents a renewed and strengthened version of Kate Raworth’s well-known Doughnut model, which describes the social and ecological boundaries to human wellbeing. The model shows twelve dimensions and their illustrative indicators are derived from internationally agreed minimum standards for human wellbeing, and it relates to nearly all of the SDGs.
This study illustrates how consumer social risk footprints can assist in achieving the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). For their social footprint, The authors select 4 indicators related to five of the UN's SDGs: gender equality (SDG 5 also 8.5 & 8.8); mother and child health (SDG 3, especially 3.1 & 3.2); governance (SDG 16, especially 16.5 & 16.6); and access to clean water (SDG 6, especially 6.1 & 6.2). The results discussed are important for the UN in developing partnerships to address the SDG's and for organisations such as the World Bank, Trade Unions and NGOs' work towards a fairer world.
Shakespeare’s allegory can be employed to articulate sustainable strategies in many of the SDG themes. For example, SDG 3 (Good health and well-being); SDG 7 (Affordable and clean energy); SDG 8 (Decent Work and economic growth); SDG 13 (Climate Action) and SDG 16 (Peace, Justice and Strong Institutions). This article examines how Shakespeare's works anticipate sustainability narratives for society at large and its individual actors.
Elsevier,

Journal of Cleaner Production, Volume 140, Part 3, 1 January 2017, Pages 1860-1871

Resolution of financial distress should be easy, flexible and efficient.The authors of this paper seek to provide evidence on the most popular reforms in bankruptcy between 2005 and 2013. They recommend reforms that should provide sustainable ways of resolving distress and can serve as examples for countries still reforming or establishing a decent bankruptcy regime. This article explores the several of the targets underpinning SDG 10 and the strong institutions required to deliver them as per SDG 16.
Elsevier,

International Journal of Law, Crime and Justice, Volume 47, December 2016, Pages 71-84

Equality before the law is a fundamental principle of modern law, however, examining access to justice for men and women shows that women face certain barriers in accessing justice. This paper details a study in Turkey on the linkages between SDG 5 gender equality and SDG 16 peace, justice and strong institutions.
Effective implementation of rules on reduced emission from avoided deforestation and forest degradation (REDD +) depends on the compatibility between these rules and existing sectoral policies associated with forests. These authors examine the coherence between REDD + polices and Kenyan policies. They find that coherence is impaired by lack of cross-sectorial consultations on REDD + and that a lack of coherence at the national level creates conflicts at the local level. Cross-sectorial consultative framework is therefore a prerequisite for policy coherence. This paper addresses SDGs 13, 15 and 16.
Elsevier,

Agricultural Law and Economics in Sub-Saharan Africa: Cases and Comments, Chapter 5, 2016, Pages 141–184

This chapter examines contracting between literate and illiterate parties in sub-Saharan Africa in a market-led development approach. It supports goal 16 (peace, justice and strong institutions) and goal 10 (reduced inequalities).
Elsevier,

World Development, February 2015, Pages 707 - 718

Are NGOs able to meet long-term transformative goals in their work for development and social justice? Given their weak roots in civil society and the rising tide of technocracy that has swept through the world of foreign aid, most NGOs remain poorly placed to influence the drivers of social change. By applying their knowledge of local contexts to strengthen their roles in empowerment and social transformation, they have the ability to advance SDG target 16.7 to ensure responsive, inclusive, participatory and representative decision-making at all levels.
Elsevier,

Journal of Criminal Justice, Volume 42, Issue 4, July–August 2014, Pages 338 - 346

History shows that one of the most important institutions to a society is its criminal justice system. The current study offers an analysis of the US criminal justice system’s effectiveness in identifying, apprehending, convicting, and punishing high-level/persistent offenders. The goal of SDG target 16.3 to promote the rule of law at the national and international levels and to ensure equal access to justice for all relies to a large extent on an effective criminal justice system.

Pages