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Stop harrasment #metoo
As employers continue to deal with the fallout of the #MeToo movement, the importance of effective sexual harassment training has become more clear. Having a workplace that is free of sexual harassment supports SDGs 5, 8 and 10. This article provides advice on why effective sexual harassment training is needed now more than ever, and best practices that apply no matter where you are.
Despite the fact that getting a job with a living wage decreases the risk that an individual will commit another crime, society places many barriers to people with criminal records re-entering the workforce. SDGs 8 and 10 includes bringing the formerly incarcerated back as contributing members of society by providing meaningful work. SDG 5 also is impacted, as bias against women with criminal histories is greater than against men. A new study reveals that misconceptions that prevent employers from considering job applicants with criminal histories are not supported by the data; these workers prove to be as good or a better “quality of hire” than employees without a criminal record.
An XpertHR survey shows that the problem of sexual harassment continues to be a high concern of employers. Providing a safe and legal workplace environment are part of achieving SDGs 5, 8 and 10. This article addresses concerns and offers practical advice on preventing and/or addressing sexual harassment in the workplace.
LexisNexis Legal & Professional,

LexisNexis UK, LexisPSL, Risk and Compliance, 8 June 2017

In the UK, the Modern Slavery Act 2015 sets out the requirement for some organisations to produce and publish an annual slavery and human trafficking statement, putting efforts to tackle slavery and human trafficking on the corporate agenda. This overview from LexisPSL provides guidance on the Modern Slavery Act’s obligation to produce a statement. The role of corporates is key to SDG 8.7 and the taking of immediate and effective measures to eradicate forced labour, end modern slavery and human trafficking.
This Practice Note from LexisPSL explains, for in-house lawyers, section 54 of the UK’s Modern Slavery Act 2015, which contains a requirement for large commercial organisations (total turnover of £36m or more) to publish an annual slavery and human trafficking statement. The process of compliance with the Modern Slavery Act 2015 is a core plank of advancing SDG 8.7 and the taking of immediate and effective measures to eradicate forced labour, end modern slavery and human trafficking.
Slave Free Seas charitable trust New Zealand logo

LexisNexis New Zealand and the Slave Free Seas Charitable Trust have created a free legal resource to assist advocates for victims of human trafficking, comprising practical information on advocacy and policy change. This guidance is essential for target 8.7 and the eradication of forced labour, modern slavery and human trafficking, as well as SDG 16.3 and access to justice.

LexisNexis Australia has created a free legal resource to assist those working on pro bono cases and social justice issues. It provides practical information on charities, federal discrimination law matters, human trafficking cases and applying for humanitarian immigration into Australia for victims of human trafficking. This free guidance supports target 8.7 and the eradication of forced labour, modern slavery and human trafficking, as well as SDG 16.3 and access to justice.