Health Equity

" This Comment article supports SDG 3 and 10 by proposing that future studies exploring the link between racism and health inequalities are designed with more theoretically informed research questions, whose findings can more readily help tackle existing problems. Suggested areas for further research include the impact of neighourhood desegregation, increased racial diversity in labour markets, and reduced mass incarceration in diminishing racial health inequalities.
Elsevier,

The Lancet Digital Health, Volume 3, March 2021

This Comment supports SDGs 3 and 10 by highlighting the role of data scientists in challenging racism and discrimination. The Comment highlights how structural inequalities in society are easily encoded in datasets and in the application of data science, which can reinforce existing injustices.
Conceptual measurement framework for impacts of gender inequality on the wellbeing of children and adolescents
Background: By adulthood, gender inequalities in health and wellbeing are apparent. Yet, the timing and nature of gender inequalities during childhood and adolescence are less clear. We describe the emergence of gender inequalities in health and wellbeing across the first two decades of life. Methods: We focused on the 40 low-income and middle-income countries in Asia and the Pacific. A measurement framework was developed around four key domains of wellbeing across the first two decades: health, education and transition to employment, protection, and a safe environment.
Elsevier, Advances in Radiation Oncology, Volume 5, 1 September 2020
Recent events have reaffirmed that racism is a pervasive disease plaguing the United States and infiltrating the fabric of this nation. As health care professionals dedicated to understanding and alleviating disease, many radiation oncologists have failed to acknowledge how structural racism affects the health and well-being of the patients we aim to serve.
Introduction: Dermatologic disease represents a significant burden worldwide, but the regional effect of skin disease in the Caribbean and how it relates to socioeconomic status remain unknown. Objective: This study aims to measure the burden of skin disease in the Caribbean from epidemiologic and socioeconomic standpoints. Methods: We selected Global Burden of Disease Study data sets to analyze disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs) and the annual rate of change of dermatoses between 1990 and 2017 in 18 Caribbean countries and the United States.
The Government of Ghana has instituted a National Poverty Reduction Program with an initiative known as the Community-based Health Planning and Services (CHPS) as its core health development strategy.

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