Health Inequities

Objectives: Health inequities exist for racial groups as a result of political, societal, historical and economic injustices, such as colonisation and racism. To address this, health professions have applied various health education pedagogies to equip learners to contribute better to cultural safety. The aim of this realist review was to provide an overview of cultural safety programs that evaluate transition of learning to practice to generate program theory as to what strategies best translate cultural safety theory to practice for nurses and midwives.
From the more than 700,000 deaths from COVID-19 in the US and the nearly 5 million worldwide, there emerge even more stories than match the statistics when one considers all of the patients' relations. While the numbers are staggering, when we humanize the stories, we are left with even greater devastation, of course. One of the stories among so many that seemed particularly salient and poignant to us was the death of Dr. Susan Moore.
The COVID-19 pandemic is unprecedented. The pandemic not only induced a public health crisis, but has led to severe economic, social, and educational crises. Across economies and societies, the distributional consequences of the pandemic have been uneven. Among groups living in vulnerable conditions, the pandemic substantially magnified the inequality gaps, with possible negative implications for these individuals' long-term physical, socioeconomic, and mental wellbeing.
This Research paper supports SDGs 3 and 10 by providing national US estimates of the association between fatal police violence and pregnancy loss. Fatalities were measured within core-based statistical areas (census-defined urban areas). The findings showed that for each additional police-related fatality during the first 6 months of gestation there was a decrease in the total number of live births within the area. There was a decrease in births among Black women, but not among White women.