Microflora

Trillions of microbes cover the surfaces of our bodies and inhabit our gastrointestinal tract. In the past decade, research efforts examining the role of the microbiome in mental health have moved to the forefront of neuroscience and psychiatry. Based on a foundation of animal studies demonstrating the vital role for microbiota-brain communication in brain development, behavior, and brain function over the life span, clinical studies have started to consider the microbiome in psychiatric disorders.
Elsevier, Pharmacology Biochemistry and Behavior, Volume 184, September 2019
Background: Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common neurodegenerative disease causing dementia in the elderly population. Due to the fact that there is still no cure for Alzheimer's dementia and available treatment strategies bring only symptomatic benefits, there is a pressing demand for other effective strategies such as diet. Since the inflammation hypothesis gained considerable significance in the AD pathogenesis, elucidating the modulatory role of dietary factors on inflammation may help to prevent, delay the onset and slow the progression of AD.