Nurses

Objectives: Health inequities exist for racial groups as a result of political, societal, historical and economic injustices, such as colonisation and racism. To address this, health professions have applied various health education pedagogies to equip learners to contribute better to cultural safety. The aim of this realist review was to provide an overview of cultural safety programs that evaluate transition of learning to practice to generate program theory as to what strategies best translate cultural safety theory to practice for nurses and midwives.
Purpose: The purpose of this study was to explore male nurses’ experiences of workplace gender discrimination and sexual harassment in South Korea. Methods: Phenomenological qualitative methodology exploring male nurses’ experiences was employed to collect data, and thematic analysis of the data was conducted. Research subjects were recruited by convenience and snowball sampling. Ten male nurses participated in individual in-depth interviews via mobile phone. Data were collected from June 15 to July 24, 2020.
Background: The current coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has put an enormous stress on the mental health of frontline health care workers. Objective: Psychiatry departments in medical centers need to develop support systems to help our colleagues cope with this stress.
Young gay men are affected by HIV. Due to a lack of studies on these males, and that previous research notes youth's minimal healthcare seeking, we recruited young gay men at a gay men's STI testing clinic to explore their perceptions of care. Eight men participated in semi-structured interviews. Our results identified that, while our participants experienced stigma in some interactions, particularly when healthcare workers emphasized the probability of contracting HIV for gay men, overall they reported positive experiences with healthcare providers, particularly at the gay men's STI clinic.