Nutrition

Transitioning toward plant-based diets can alleviate health and sustainability challenges. However, research on interventions that influence animal-product consumption remains fragmented and inaccessible to researchers and practitioners. We conducted an overview of systematic reviews, also known as a meta-review. We searched five databases for reviews that examined interventions that influence (increase or decrease) the consumption of animal products.
Graphical abstract of article
Background: Malnutrition is a serious condition that develops when the human body is deprived of or does not obtain the right amount of vital nutrients like vitamins, minerals, proteins, carbohydrates, lipids and some other essential substances that the body needs to function. It can have a significant impact on people's health including stunted growth, low body weight and muscle wasting.
Proteins serve as an imperative macronutrient in human nutrition and well-being. Their nutritional quality substantially varies with their digestibility, amino acid profile, bioavailability, processing and purity. From a nutritional viewpoint, the ideal integration of proteins from diverse plant sources can supply an adequate amount of essential amino acids to fulfil human health needs. The use of plant-derived proteins has recently gained momentum due to their multifaceted edible and nonedible applications and their biodegradable nature.
The COVID-19 pandemic is unprecedented. The pandemic not only induced a public health crisis, but has led to severe economic, social, and educational crises. Across economies and societies, the distributional consequences of the pandemic have been uneven. Among groups living in vulnerable conditions, the pandemic substantially magnified the inequality gaps, with possible negative implications for these individuals' long-term physical, socioeconomic, and mental wellbeing.
The novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has pushed the medical system to its breaking point. While the virus does not discriminate, the elderly and those with comorbidities, including hypertension severe obesity, diabetes mellitus, coronary disease, pneumonia and dementia, are at a greater risk for adverse outcomes due to COVID-19. While many people navigate their new normal, the question of what the long-lasting effects of the pandemic may be, lingers.
Background: Almost a quarter of the world's undernourished people live in India. We tested the effects of three nutrition-sensitive agriculture (NSA) interventions on maternal and child nutrition in India. Methods: We did a parallel, four-arm, observer-blind, cluster-randomised trial in Keonjhar district, Odisha, India. A cluster was one or more villages with a combined minimum population of 800 residents.
Elsevier,

The Lancet Global Health, Volume 9, April 2021

This Comment article supports SDGs 3, 10, and 17 by highlighting the need for full inclusivity and representation, and the involvement of a diverse range of stakeholders and voices, in order to successfully design solutions to global health problems and to reform the systems that are exacerbating global health inequities.
Healthcare professionals are exposed to several stress factors, especially during health emergency situations like Covid-19. Psychological distress in the COVID-19 era adversely affects both healthcare professionals' mental and physical health, decreasing performance and efficiency at work. Nevertheless, no sufficient emphasis has been placed so far on the role of nutrition against stress and anxiety among healthcare professionals.
In this paper, we conducted a narrative review to describe age-specific characteristics that inform how children and adolescents interact with their food systems and how that relationship influences their diets. Children of all ages are active agents in determining the foods they eat. Numerous intrapersonal, interpersonal, and environmental characteristics influence their diets, and these shift over time.
Elsevier, Global Food Security, Volume 27, December 2020
Transforming food systems is essential to ensuring nutritious, safe, affordable, and sustainable diets for all, including children and adolescents. This paper proposes a new conceptual framework (the ‘Innocenti Framework’) to better articulate how the diets of children and adolescents are shaped by food systems.

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