Plant Proteins

Graphical abstract of article
Innovative food products containing new ingredients have been designed to meet nutritional needs and new consumption trends. In this way, different vegetable species, named unconventional food plants (UFPs), are being studied in the literature and are emerging as candidates to provide foods containing a better composition, providing greater healthiness. Furthermore, specific vegetable tissues discarded in post-harvest and/or industrial pre-processing operations can be considered UFPs adequate for human consumption.
Odorant profile analysis of fermented and unfermented protein blends.
Plant proteins can serve as inexpensive and environmentally friendly meat-replacements. However, poor taste characteristics and relatively low nutritional value prevent their full acceptance as meat substitutes. Fermentation of food has been historically used to improve the quality of foods. In this work we describe the improvement in digestibility, nutritional value, physical properties, and organoleptic characteristics, of a pea and rice protein concentrate blend through fermentation with shiitake mushroom mycelium.
Proteins serve as an imperative macronutrient in human nutrition and well-being. Their nutritional quality substantially varies with their digestibility, amino acid profile, bioavailability, processing and purity. From a nutritional viewpoint, the ideal integration of proteins from diverse plant sources can supply an adequate amount of essential amino acids to fulfil human health needs. The use of plant-derived proteins has recently gained momentum due to their multifaceted edible and nonedible applications and their biodegradable nature.
To feed the world's growing population in the future, there must be a protein transition from animal-based to more sustainable, plant-based sources. Hybrid plant-meat products can bridge the protein-transition and are also focused on nutritional and sustainability aspects. While the addition of powdered proteins changes the texture of meat products, textured proteins have been shown to achieve higher sensorial acceptability.
Infant formulas (IFs) can be defined as substitutes for human milk, which are mostly based on cow milk proteins. For sustainability reasons, alternative to animal proteins in food have to be considered. Plant proteins offer interesting nutritional and functional benefits for the development of innovative IFs. However, the behaviour of these proteins during processing and storage must ensure the physical stability and ability to reconstitution of IF powders, and that needs to be tested.