Pregnancy

Elsevier, Journal of Transport and Health, Volume 24, March 2022
Introduction: Limited research has explored the influence of commuting on expectant mother's health and well-being and how expectant mothers can be supported during their commute. The present study aimed to identify the impact of commuting during pregnancy on women's physical and mental health. Further, the effectiveness of Transport for London's baby-on-board badge was explored. Method: This was a mixed-method study. An online survey of 295 participants over the age of 18 years was conducted to explore their views on commuting and the effectiveness of the baby-on-board badge.
Problem: Within maternity care policies and practice, pregnant migrant women are regarded as a vulnerable population. Background: Women's experiential knowledge is a key element of woman-centred care but is insufficiently addressed in midwifery practice and research that involves migrant women. Aim: To examine if pregnant migrant women's experiential knowledge of vulnerability corresponds with sets of criteria of vulnerability, and to explore how migrant women make sense of vulnerability during pregnancy.
Background: Nutrient deficiencies limit human development and could be caused by the high cost of locally available foods needed to meet nutrient requirements. We aimed to identify the populations whose nutrient needs are most difficult to meet with existing global food systems.
Background: Nearly 40% of the world's population is exposed daily to household air pollution. The relative impact of prenatal and postnatal household air pollution exposure on early childhood pneumonia, a leading cause of mortality, is unknown. Research Question: Are prenatal or postnatal household air pollution, or both, associated with pneumonia risk in the first year of life? Study Design and Methods: The Ghana Randomized Air Pollution and Health Study enrolled 1,414 nonsmoking, pregnant women before 24 weeks’ gestation with prospective follow-up to the child's age of 1 year.
Background: Infections are among the leading causes of maternal mortality and morbidity. The Global Maternal Sepsis and Neonatal Initiative, launched in 2016 by WHO and partners, sought to reduce the burden of maternal infections and sepsis and was the basis upon which the Global Maternal Sepsis Study (GLOSS) was implemented in 2017. In this Article, we aimed to describe the availability of facility resources and services and to analyse their association with maternal outcomes.
Elsevier,

eClinicalMedicine, Volume 37, July 2021

This Research paper supports SDGs 3 and 10 by characterising racial disparities among pregnant women with SARS-CoV-2. The findings showed that Black women were more likely to have occupational exposure to SARS-CoV-2 than White women and that Black women with SARS-CoV-2 during pregnancy were more likely to have a preterm delivery.
Research activism to urgently improve Indigenous perinatal health and wellbeing.
Background: Half of the world's missing female births occur in India, due to sex-selective abortion. It is unknown whether selective abortion of female fetuses has changed in recent years across different birth orders. We sought to document the trends in missing female births, particularly among second and third children, at national and state levels.
Background: Although hindrances to the sexual and reproductive health of women are expected because of COVID-19, the actual effect of the pandemic on contraceptive use and unintended pregnancy risk in women, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa, remains largely unknown. We aimed to examine population-level changes in the need for and use of contraception by women during the COVID-19 pandemic, determine if these changes differed by sociodemographic characteristics, and compare observed changes during the COVID-19 pandemic with trends in the 2 preceding years.
Objective: To explore and describe norms concerning maternity, femininity and cisgender in lesbian and bisexual women and transgender people (LBT) assigned female at birth, with an expressed fear of childbirth (FOC). Design: Semi-structured interviews were conducted with self-identified LBT people with an expressed FOC. Participants: 17 self-identified LBT people participated. 15 had an expressed FOC, and two were non-afraid partners. Findings: Participants described how their FOC was related to ideals of “the primal woman”, including ideals of a natural birth.

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