Prenatal Care

Elsevier, Preventive Medicine, Volume 155, February 2022
Contested racial identity— self-identified race not matching socially-assigned race—may be an indication of experiences with racism. We aimed to understand the relationship between contested racial identity and women's health behaviors, health outcomes, and infant health outcomes. We used 2012–2015 Massachusetts Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System data on 5735 women linked with infants' birth certificates.
Elsevier,

eClinicalMedicine, Volume 37, July 2021

This Research paper supports SDGs 3 and 10 by characterising racial disparities among pregnant women with SARS-CoV-2. The findings showed that Black women were more likely to have occupational exposure to SARS-CoV-2 than White women and that Black women with SARS-CoV-2 during pregnancy were more likely to have a preterm delivery.
This study supports SDG 3 and 10 by highlighting the increased prevalence of diabetes and gestational diabetes in Indigenous women compared with non-Indigenous women, across Australia, Canada, New Zealand, and the USA. These findings highlight the need for system-wide and structural interventions to reduce the risk of diabetes and gestational diabetes in Indigenous women before, during, and after pregnancy.
Objective: To report various components of health system responsiveness among poor internal migrants who availed the government health facilities in 13 Indian cities. Materials and methods: Cluster random sampling was used to select 50,806 migrant households, of which 14,263 households avail the government health facility in last six months. In addition, 5072 women, who sought antenatal care and 3946 women who had delivery in government health facility during last six months were also included.
This study supports SDGs 3 and 6 by showing that elementary WASH interventions alone were insufficient in reducing the prevalence of stunting, anaemia, and diarrhoea in children in rural Zimbabwe; these findings call for greater investment into, and scale-up of, WASH programmes in rural settings, in order to achieve more meaningful improvements in child health outcomes.
Background West Africa has the highest proportion of married adolescents, and the highest adolescent childbirth rate and maternal death rate in sub-Saharan Africa. However, few studies have focused on the type and quality of health care accessed by pregnant young women in countries in this subregion. Methods We obtained data from Demographic and Health Surveys done between 2010 and 2014, to compare the use, timing, source, and components of antenatal care between adolescent and older first-time mothers in 13 west African countries.
Objectives malaria causes complications during 80% of all pregnancies in Uganda. However, only 48% of Ugandan pregnant women took one dose of intermittent preventive therapy while merely 27% took the second dose during 2011. This study investigated midwives’ provision of anti-malaria services in the Buikwe District of Uganda. Design a quantitative exploratory descriptive design was used. Setting prenatal clinics (n=16) in the Buikwe District of Uganda Respondents questionnaires were completed by 40 (out of a population of 45) midwives.
Background In transitioning from the Millennium Development Goal to the Sustainable Development Goal era, it is imperative to comprehensively assess progress toward reducing maternal mortality to identify areas of success, remaining challenges, and frame policy discussions. We aimed to quantify maternal mortality throughout the world by underlying cause and age from 1990 to 2015.