Psychosis

This study supports SDG 3 and 10 by highlighting an overrepresentation of Black children and adolescents in involuntary psychiatric hospitalisations, which may establish potentially lifelong negative mental health treatment trajectories and contribute to cycles of health inequality that persist in later life.
Background: Alcohol use disorder is a highly prevalent disease with multiple medications available for treatment. The overall prevalence of patients receiving pharmacotherapy is believed to be low and the characteristics and comorbidities that affect receipt are not well-established. Methods: We created a dataset from Truven Health Analytics MarketScan Commercial Claims and Encounters Database of patients with an outpatient encounter for alcohol abuse or dependence in 2014.
Black ethnicity is associated with increased risk for psychosis in South London. This study explored the distribution of ethnicity among services users at ultra high risk for psychosis (UHR) and examined the influence of ethnicity on service access, treatment uptake and incidence of psychosis. The ethnic distribution of 228 people at UHR for psychosis, seen in an early detection clinical service over 10 years, was compared with 146 people with first episode psychosis from the same geographic region and census figures for the local population.