Qualitative Analysis

Elsevier, Transportation Research Part D: Transport and Environment, Volume 103, February 2022
Efficiency, consistency and sufficiency as complementary strategies for sustainable mobility.
Transport justice has two essential dimensions: (1) compensating for inequalities in access to mobility, and (2) mitigating the disproportionately burdensome negative consequences of transport. In light of the urgently needed action regarding climate change especially in the transport sector, measures reducing carbon emissions to mitigate the impact are inevitable. However, policy measures for reaching climate targets should avoid increasing unequal mobility chances. Therefore, there is a need for concepts striving to mitigate both climate impacts and transport injustice.
In 2011 ICAO published a report about projected pilot and training capacity shortage (ICAO, 2011). To solve this problem, several studies have been carried out, and forecasts of the required number of pilots for the next 10–20 years are constantly being updated. Universities have begun introducing pilot training into their aviation courses, although only US airlines require a degree from the candidates to work as a pilot.
Elsevier, Women's Studies International Forum, Volume 89, 1 November 2021
This article presents unique data on the economic and social impacts of Violence against Women and Girls (VAWG) in development contexts. The article draws on quantitative and qualitative data from over 5120 women in Ghana (2066 respondents) and Pakistan (3054 respondents) collected between 2016 and 2018 to assess the impacts on productivity, primarily through presenteeism and absenteeism, in paid and unpaid work due to a range of forms of VAWG.
Elsevier, International Journal of Intercultural Relations, Volume 85, November 2021
Ethnic-racial socialization is a mechanism through which immigrant parents instill in their children a sense of pride in their culture while preparing them for negative experiences with racial and cultural out-groups. For Black immigrant parents, this can include promoting a wariness of Black Americans in their children. Through this lens, we investigated an understudied intercultural dynamic via interviews with 12 first- and second-generation African and Caribbean immigrants.
Background: Africa is undergoing both an environmental and an epidemiological transition. Household air pollution is the predominant form of air pollution, but it is declining, whereas ambient air pollution is increasing. We aimed to quantify how air pollution is affecting health, human capital, and the economy across Africa, with a particular focus on Ethiopia, Ghana, and Rwanda. Methods: Data on household and ambient air pollution were from WHO Global Health Observatory, and data on morbidity and mortality were from the 2019 Global Burden of Disease Study.
Elsevier, Women's Studies International Forum, Volume 88, 1 September 2021
Various researches have been carried out in the past to understand psychological trauma that suggest that gender differences can be observed in the type, prevalence, and impact of trauma. Ample evidence exists that indicates that women are often the target of different kinds of gender-based violence, causing them to experience physical and psychological trauma. However, the trauma associated with one such gender-based crime, acid attack, has been less explored and lacks due representation in media and literature. Moreover, trauma has mostly been studied from a clinical perspective.
Cities are wrestling with the practical challenges of transitioning urban water services to become water sensitive; capable of enhancing liveability, sustainability, resilience and productivity in the face of climate change, rapid urbanisation, degraded ecosystems and ageing infrastructure. Indicators can be valuable for guiding actions for improvement, but there is not yet an established index that measures the full suite of attributes that constitute water sensitive performance.
Objectives: ‘Dementia Friends’ is a programme used to raise awareness of dementia, developed by the Alzheimer's Society, which has been delivered across the UK to diverse populations, including adolescents. However, there is little evidence available with regards to adolescents' perceptions of the programme and its impact. This study aims to explore this in a group of adolescents from the south of England. Study design: Focus group discussions. Methods: Thirty adolescents aged between 11 and 16 years were recruited from two schools in East Sussex, England.
Aims: To determine the pooled effectiveness of multidiscipinary care teams (MCTs) in reducing major amputation rates in adults with diabetes. Methods: A systematic review and meta-analysis was performed, searching databases MEDLINE, EMBASE, Google Scholar, Cochrane Library, and Clinicaltrials.gov thru October 2018. We included only before-after studies comparing amputation rates before and after the implementation of a MCT for the prevention of major amputation in adults with diabetes. Our primary outcome was relative risk of major amputation.
Food exchange between human populations can mitigate the risk arising from variable food production. Networks of exchange vary according to context but tend to fall into a relatively small number of qualitatively different types, including altruism, reciprocity, and resource pooling. This apparent canalization raises the question of whether specific networks of food exchange exhibit features that allow them to persist in the longer term, and we address this question by using a model of food exchange among multiple populations.

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