Qualitative Research

Problem: Within maternity care policies and practice, pregnant migrant women are regarded as a vulnerable population. Background: Women's experiential knowledge is a key element of woman-centred care but is insufficiently addressed in midwifery practice and research that involves migrant women. Aim: To examine if pregnant migrant women's experiential knowledge of vulnerability corresponds with sets of criteria of vulnerability, and to explore how migrant women make sense of vulnerability during pregnancy.
Objective: To explore and describe norms concerning maternity, femininity and cisgender in lesbian and bisexual women and transgender people (LBT) assigned female at birth, with an expressed fear of childbirth (FOC). Design: Semi-structured interviews were conducted with self-identified LBT people with an expressed FOC. Participants: 17 self-identified LBT people participated. 15 had an expressed FOC, and two were non-afraid partners. Findings: Participants described how their FOC was related to ideals of “the primal woman”, including ideals of a natural birth.
Objectives: ‘Dementia Friends’ is a programme used to raise awareness of dementia, developed by the Alzheimer's Society, which has been delivered across the UK to diverse populations, including adolescents. However, there is little evidence available with regards to adolescents' perceptions of the programme and its impact. This study aims to explore this in a group of adolescents from the south of England. Study design: Focus group discussions. Methods: Thirty adolescents aged between 11 and 16 years were recruited from two schools in East Sussex, England.
Elsevier, Women's Studies International Forum, Volume 79, March - April 2020
Objectives: Limited studies have investigated detailed insights into the experiences of women in transitioning countries such as Iran as active agents in their lives and their societies. This study explores how young Iranian women build and use their social capital to make a social change and improve their status. Methods: This study is the qualitative component of a larger mixed-method study exploring social capital and wellbeing in young Iranian women. Semi-structured, in-depth interviews were conducted with 17 young Iranian women aged 18–35.
Elsevier, Journal of Clinical and Translational Endocrinology, Volume 15, March 2019
Background: The International Diabetes Federation (IDF) launched the Kids and Diabetes in School (KiDS) project in collaboration with the International Society for Paediatric and Adolescent Diabetes (ISPAD) and Sanofi Diabetes to inform and teach school staff, children and parents on the management of diabetes in school. Brazil and India were chosen as pilot countries. Methods: The evaluation was conducted using a qualitative methodology using semi-structured face to face in-depth interviews.
Background: Women are under-represented in surgery and leave training in higher proportions than men. Studies in this area are without a feminist lens and predominantly use quantitative methods not well suited to the complexity of the problem. Methods: In this qualitative study, a researcher interviewed women who had chosen to leave surgical training.
Elsevier, Social Science and Medicine, Volume 167, 1 October 2016
Energy insecurity is a multi-dimensional construct that describes the interplay between physical conditions of housing, household energy expenditures and energy-related coping strategies. The present study uses an adapted grounded theory approach based on in-depth interviews with 72 low-income families to advance the concept of energy insecurity. Study results illustrate the layered components of energy insecurity by providing rich and nuanced narratives of the lived experiences of affected households.
Purpose of the study: The process of involving older clients with regard to their care arrangements has been the subject of previous studies. However, a more general overview of the issues addressed by older people living in long-term care (LTC) facilities, in order to inform practice improvements, is missing. This article explores which aspects of care that older people in LTC facilities want to improve, by means of a collective policy agenda-setting project, during which the participants voice their own experiences and concerns regarding LTC.

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