Racism

Objectives: Health inequities exist for racial groups as a result of political, societal, historical and economic injustices, such as colonisation and racism. To address this, health professions have applied various health education pedagogies to equip learners to contribute better to cultural safety. The aim of this realist review was to provide an overview of cultural safety programs that evaluate transition of learning to practice to generate program theory as to what strategies best translate cultural safety theory to practice for nurses and midwives.
Elsevier, Preventive Medicine, Volume 155, February 2022
Contested racial identity— self-identified race not matching socially-assigned race—may be an indication of experiences with racism. We aimed to understand the relationship between contested racial identity and women's health behaviors, health outcomes, and infant health outcomes. We used 2012–2015 Massachusetts Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System data on 5735 women linked with infants' birth certificates.
From the more than 700,000 deaths from COVID-19 in the US and the nearly 5 million worldwide, there emerge even more stories than match the statistics when one considers all of the patients' relations. While the numbers are staggering, when we humanize the stories, we are left with even greater devastation, of course. One of the stories among so many that seemed particularly salient and poignant to us was the death of Dr. Susan Moore.
The COVID-19 pandemic has shed light on the ongoing pandemic of racial injustice. In the context of these twin pandemics, emergency medicine organizations are declaring that “Racism is a Public Health Crisis.” Accordingly, we are challenging emergency clinicians to respond to this emergency and commit to being antiracist. This courageous journey begins with naming racism and continues with actions addressing the intersection of racism and social determinants of health that result in health inequities.
Elsevier,

Trends in Molecular Medicine, Volume 27, September 2021

Race-based assumptions in biomedical journal articles.
Elsevier, American Journal of Kidney Diseases, Volume 77, June 2021
Kidney disease continues to manifest stark racial inequities in the United States, revealing the entrenchment of racism and bias within multiple facets of society, including in our institutions, practices, norms, and beliefs. In this perspective, we synthesize theory and evidence to describe why an understanding of race and racism is integral to kidney care, providing examples of how kidney health disparities manifest interpersonal and structural racism.
Elsevier,

The Lancet Digital Health, Volume 3, June 2021

This Comment describes how systematic biases in data linkage misestimate health needs for ethnic minorities and further entrench existing disadvantages.
This Comment, written by two Black emergency room physicians, supports SDGs 3 and 10 by highlighting low vaccination rates for COVID-19 among Black Americans. The authors explain the historical context that has led to mistrust of the health-care system among many in the Black community and present COVID-19 vaccination as an opportunity to begin to make amends.
This study supports SDGs 3 and 10 by evaluating whether residential racial segregations in the USA could restrict the capacity for social distancing, leaving African Americans potentially more exposed to COVID-19.
This Comment supports SDGs 3 and 10 by highlighting the need to centre race in the work of the global health community. The authors call on colleagues to meaningully engage with critical race theory, a transdisciplinary intellectual movement to understand and disrupt systemic racism.

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