Global Surgery 2030: evidence and solutions for achieving health, welfare, and economic development

Elsevier, The Lancet, Volume 386, Issue 9993, 8–14 August 2015, Pages 569-624
Authors: 
John G Meara, Andrew J M Leather, Lars Hagander, Blake C Alkire, Nivaldo Alonso, Emmanuel A Ameh, Stephen W Bickler, Lesong Conteh,Anna J Dare, Justine Davies, Eunice Dérivois Mérisier, Shenaaz El-Halabi, Paul E Farmer, Atul Gawande, Rowan Gillies, Sarah L M Greenberg, Caris E Grimes, Russell L Gruen, Edna Adan Ismail, Thaim Buya Kamara, Chris Lavy, Ganbold Lundeg, Nyengo C Mkandawire, Nakul P Raykar, Johanna N Riesel, Edgar Rodas, John Rose, Nobhojit Roy, Mark G Shrime, Richard Sullivan, Stéphane Verguet, David Watters, Thomas G Weiser, Iain H Wilson, Gavin Yamey, Winnie Yip

Executive summary

Remarkable gains have been made in global health in the past 25 years, but progress has not been uniform. Mortality and morbidity from common conditions needing surgery have grown in the world’s poorest regions, both in real terms and relative to other health gains. At the same time, development of safe, essential, life-saving surgical and anaesthesia care in low-income and middle-income countries (LMICs) has stagnated or regressed. In the absence of surgical care, case-fatality rates are high for common, easily treatable conditions including appendicitis, hernia, fractures, obstructed labour, congenital anomalies, and breast and cervical cancer