Ensure availability and sustainable management of water and sanitation for all

World Efficiency Solutions (WES) is the premier international meeting for the low-carbon and resource-efficient economy focussed on creating the low-carbon and resource-efficient market place. WES was first held in 2015 in Paris during COP21 negotiations, focusing on climate change solutions. World Efficiency develops a new environment consensus: economic and human activities must, to be sustainable, be redesigned to limit their impact on the environment while awareness of the planetary limits (climate change and resources scarcity) becomes widespread. A key objective for WES 2017 is to Identify new market opportunities aligned to the 2030 Sustainable Development Goals (estimated market opportunities are larger than USD 12 trillion) and the Paris Agreement on Climate Change from 2015.
relx-group-environmental-challenge
The RELX Group Environmental Challenge, with a $50,000 prize for the first place entry and a $25,000 prize for the second place entry, is awarded to projects that provide sustainable access to safe water where it is presently at risk and/or access to improved sanitation. This directly assists SDG 6.1 and 6.2 to achieve universal and equitable access to safe and affordable drinking water and access to adequate and equitable sanitation and hygiene, for all. Find out more about the 2017 winners.
2016 first prize winner of RELX Group Environmental Challenge, Loowatt, developed a waterless and energy-generating toilet system that is clean and odourless. Loowatt's patented core technology and luxury festival toilet business in the UK is helping to transform the lives of communities in Antananarivo, Madagascar's capital, through access to quality sanitation and job creation.
Relx Group Environmental Challenge logo
The RELX Group Environmental Challenge is awarded to projects that provide sustainable access to safe water where it is presently at risk and/or access to improved sanitation. Projects must have clear practical applicability, address identified need, and advance related issues such as health, education, or human rights. There is a $50,000 prize for the first place entry and a $25,000 prize for the second place entry. This directly assists SDG 6.1 and 6.2 to achieve universal and equitable access to safe and affordable drinking water and access to adequate and equitable sanitation and hygiene, for all.
Reed Exhibitions,

International Water Summit 2017, 16-19 January 2017

The International Water Summit (IWS) is a global platform for promoting water sustainability in arid regions by bringing together world leaders, field experts, academics and business innovators to accelerate the development of new sustainable strategies and technologies. Videos from the 2017 summit cover a wide range of technologies and innovations which support SDG 6 Clean Water and Sanitation and SDG 11 Sustainable Cities and Communities.
Photos of a beach on Henderson Island in the Pacific Ocean provides yet more evidence of the detrimental impact that packaging and other plastics waste is having on the environment globally. Creating a virtuous circle out of what, until now, has largely been a chain of production from feedstock to consumer will not be easy. But it is the innovation aspect that has fired the imagination of producers, processors and corporate consumers of plastics packaging. This fits with SDG 9.4 to upgrade infrastructure and retrofit industries to make them sustainable, with increased resource-use efficiency and greater adoption of clean and environmentally sound technologies and industrial processes and SDG 7 Affordable and Clean Energy.
How can innovations in chemistry, energy, and biotechnology jointly be applied in low-resource settings for the benefit of a community? This LabLinks meeting combines the expertise in the applied biosciences of Trends in Biotechnology, Joule’s interest in both scientific and sustainability developments in energy, and Chem’s focus on basic chemical science with relevance to the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals.
Elsevier,

The Lancet Planetary Health, Volume 1, Issue 2, May 2017, Pages e48-e49

This brief article presents a renewed and strengthened version of Kate Raworth’s well-known Doughnut model, which describes the social and ecological boundaries to human wellbeing. The model shows twelve dimensions and their illustrative indicators are derived from internationally agreed minimum standards for human wellbeing, and it relates to nearly all of the SDGs.
The study addresses how food production can continue using reduced water whilst at the same time bring about improved health. The growing population in India will have an impact on water availability to be used in agriculture and so the study looks at dietary patterns which use less water. They find important synergies in diets with lower water use and positive health effects. This is in-line with the achievement of SDG 2, its related targets and to a further extent SDG 6.
Maize growing under plastic

Critics claim that maize can cause unwanted environmental impacts. But supporters of the crop are able to show how by use of cover crops it can be grown responsibly, reducing or eliminating, for example, nutrient leaching and soil erosion. In south-west England, a Wessex Water project is using cover crops to protect and improve drinking water quality by working with growers whose farms surround boreholes and reservoirs that supply water for human consumption. Steps like this can contribute to SDG 6 to ensure sustainable management of water and SDG 12 to ensure sustainable production.

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