Security

Elsevier, Environmental Innovation and Societal Transitions, Volume 43, June 2022
Historically STI policy is connected to national security and the military. Yet, contemporary innovation policy is rarely discussed in a security context. This perspective argues that new, transformation-oriented innovation policies should more explicitly consider (a) the side-effects of policies on global security and (b) how the global security context influences the achievement of transitions. This need is further extrapolated by the current period of rapid major shifts in the global security landscape.
Efficient resource management and the development of resilient societies begins with an accurate identification of strengths and weaknesses of systems involved. Conducting a holistic performance analysis considering multiple assessment criteria permits the detection of discrepancies hindering systems productivity. In this study, an integrative assessment tool, based on the analytical hierarchy process (AHP) and the energy, water, and food (EWF) nexus is used to design a decision-making scheme that guides policymakers in establishing national priorities and sectorial strategies.
Elsevier, Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Volume 147, May 2021
This study assesses whether the negative exogenous informational shock of the MeToo scandal has affected women's perception of security. The MeToo movement was first reported in the media worldwide in October 2017, and has received enormous press coverage since then. The exogenous and unanticipated nature of the scandal provides a natural experiment that we can use to quantify how wider external information affects ‘ordinary’ women's perceptions of security and their willingness to report feelings of dissatisfaction with security levels.
The nature of armed conflict throughout the world is intensely dynamic. Consequently, the protection of non-combatants and the provision of humanitarian services must continually adapt to this changing conflict environment. Complex political affiliations, the systematic use of explosive weapons and sexual violence, and the use of new communication technology, including social media, have created new challenges for humanitarian actors in negotiating access to affected populations and security for their own personnel.