Celebrating Biodiversity for World Environment Day

World Environment Day is the most renowned day for environmental action. Since 1974, it has been celebrated every year on June 5th, engaging governments, businesses, celebrities and citizens to focus their efforts on a pressing environmental issue. In 2020, the theme is biodiversity, a concern that is both urgent and existential. Recent events, from bushfires in Brazil, the United States and Australia, to locust infestations across East Africa – and now, a global disease pandemic – demonstrate the interdependence of humans and the webs of life in which they exist. Nature is sending us a message.

To mark World Environment Day 2020, Elsevier presents a curated collection of 62 journal articles and book chapters devoted to biodiversity and humanity’s intimate interconnection with nature.

This special issue demonstrates how nature responds to some of the most pressing challenges faced by humans today. It provides us with oxygen, purifies the water we drink, ensures fertile soil, and produces the variety of foods we require to stay healthy and resist disease. It enables medical researchers to understand human physiology; and offers substance for developing medicines. It is the foundation of most industries and livelihoods. It even helps mitigate the impact of climate change by storing carbon and regulating local rainfall. Life on earth would not be possible without nature’s services. It is our greatest common good.

But with our increasing demands, humans have pushed nature beyond its limit. In the last 50 years, the human population has doubled; the global economy has almost quadrupled and global trade has increased by about ten times. It would take 1.6 Earths to meet the demands that humans make of nature each year.

As part of our SDG Impact of COVID-19 podcast series, RELX’s Global Head of Corporate Responsibility, Dr Márcia Balisciano, spoke to Dr Sam Scheiner, Editor-in-Chief of the Encyclopedia of Biodiversity. As discussed during this episode, the emergence of COVID-19 has underscored the fact that, when we destroy biodiversity, we destroy the system that supports human life. By upsetting the delicate balance of nature, we have created ideal conditions for pathogens – including coronaviruses – to spread.

If we don’t take care of nature, we can’t take care of ourselves. It's time to work together #ForNature.

Elsevier,

Biological Conservation, Volume 246, June 2020, 108571

This article addresses goals 13, 14 and 15 by discussing how COVID-19 is impacting biodiversity, the research needed by conservation biologists, and their ability to protect ecosystems.
Elsevier,

Biological Conservation, Volume 246, June 2020, 108524

This journal article addresses goals 13, 14 and 15 by discussing how IPBES and WWF publish global indicators of biodiversity which can be seen as scientifically highly questionable, generate simplistic and often misleading headlines in the media, and get in the way of proper science reporting.
Elsevier,

Encyclopedia of Biodiversity (Second Edition), 2013, Pages 681-707

This book chapter addresses goals 13, 14, and 15 by discussing the biodiversity of mammals, covering all ranges from a shrew to the blue whale.
Elsevier,

Encyclopedia of Biodiversity (Second Edition), 2013, Pages 691-699

This book chapter addresses goals 13, 14 and 15 by discussing how global declines of amphibians refer to the phenomenon of the population declines and even extinctions of amphibian species around the world.
Elsevier,

Encyclopedia of Biodiversity (Second Edition), 2013, Pages 399-410

This book chapter addresses goals 13, 14, 15 and 17 by discussing the definition of biodiversity that is both scientifically sensible and universally applicable; this is imperative to help guide the design of policy and programs for the future, as well as to make critical decisions in the present.
Elsevier,

Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Volume 70, April 2017, Pages 161-184

This journal article addresses goals 7, 13, 14 and 15 by discussing the impacts of different renewable energy pathways on ecosystems and biodiversity, and the implications of these impacts for transitioning to a Green Economy.
Elsevier,

Biomass and Bioenergy, Volume 35, Issue 10, 15 October 2011, Pages 4390-4398

This journal article addresses goals 7, 13 and 15 by discussing how wood residues from forest harvesting or disturbance wood from wildfire and insect outbreaks may be viewed as biomass “feedstocks” for bioenergy production to help reduce our dependence on fossil fuels.
Elsevier,

Biomass and Bioenergy, Volume 55, August 2013, Pages 73-86

This journal article addresses goals 7, 11, 12 and 15 by discussing how increased demand for biomass for bioenergy purposes may lead to a continued conversion of valuable habitats into productive lands and to intensification, which both have negative effects on biodiversity.
Elsevier,

Biomass and Bioenergy, Volume 125, June 2019, Pages 180-187

This journal article addresses goals 7, 12, 13 and 15 by discussing how the rising demand for renewable resources has increased silage maize production which has adverse environmental effects and therefore limits the advantages of renewable biomass.
Elsevier,

Plastic Waste and Recycling, Environmental Impact, Societal Issues, Prevention, and Solutions, 2020, pages 223 - 249

This book chapter addresses goals 14, 15, and 12 by exploring the origins of microplastics (relating to our society, production and consumption) and the diverse and harmful impacts of microplastics in the marine environment on life underwater, as well as interactions with humans and other life on land at the end of the cycle.