Earth Day 2022

On April 22 every year, we celebrate the anniversary of the birth of the modern environmental movement with Earth Day. Since the first Earth Day in 1970, this day has marked global collaboration and awareness of the need to fight for a cleaner and healthier Earth. It all began in 1962 when Rachel Carson’s Silent Spring hit the New York’s bestseller list selling over 500,000 copies in 24 countries. As public awareness and concerns were raised over the environment, and the links between pollution and public health were put in the spotlight, Earth Day 1970 would come to provide a voice to this emerging environmental awareness. Today, with over 190 engaged and committed countries and over 1 billion individuals involved, Earth Day has come a long way. Since the first Earth Day, important strides have been made worldwide including the signing of the historic Paris Agreement and the implementation of the UN Sustainable Development Goals, and Earth Day continues to grow every year.

This year, the theme is “Invest In Our Planet” with a focus on preserving and protecting our health, our families, and our livelihoods because a green future is a prosperous future. To help you engage with Earth Day and its values, Elsevier presents a curated list of publicly available journal articles and book chapters. At Elsevier, we support environmental awareness an the goal of achieving a sustainable and equitable future. Together, we must #InvestInOurPlanet.

Elsevier, Future Foods, Volume 5, June 2022
Transitioning toward plant-based diets can alleviate health and sustainability challenges. However, research on interventions that influence animal-product consumption remains fragmented and inaccessible to researchers and practitioners. We conducted an overview of systematic reviews, also known as a meta-review. We searched five databases for reviews that examined interventions that influence (increase or decrease) the consumption of animal products.
Elsevier, Future Foods, Volume 5, June 2022
Cow's milk is considered a staple in many diets due to its high nutritional value. It contains almost every nutrient that the human body needs. Milk is consumed as a beverage, poured on several foods, and added to coffee, tea, and smoothies. Furthermore, many food products are produced from cow's milk, such as ice cream, yogurt, cheese, butter, cake, desserts, and others. However, it is not a suitable option for everyone for reasons, including lactose intolerance, milk allergy, dietary restrictions, and potential health risks.
Elsevier, Digital Signal Processing: A Review Journal, Volume 123, 30 April 2022
With the continuous development of human society, people's over-exploitation of nature leads to frequent environmental problems. A large number of floating objects appear on lakes, rivers, reservoirs and other water surfaces. Water floats have seriously damaged the ecological environment and directly threatened the survival and development of human beings. Therefore, for the sustainable development of human beings, we must solve the problem of water pollution. The detection of floating pollutants on water surface is the primary goal of water resource management.
Elsevier, Chest, Volume 161, March 2022
Background: Individuals with COPD have increased sensitivity to traffic-related air pollution (TRAP) such as diesel exhaust (DE), but little is known about the acute effects of TRAP on exercise responses in COPD. Research Question: Does exposure before exercise to TRAP (DE titrated to 300 μg/m3 particulate matter
Elsevier, Future Foods, Volume 5, June 2022
Meat induces large environmental impact while supplying important nutrients, and meat substitutes are increasingly adopted as direct replacers of meat products. This study assessed the environmental impact of a pork schnitzel and two soy-based schnitzels in terms of three different functional units to reflect the products’ functions as meal components and suppliers of high quality proteins. For a functional unit of 1 kg of product, the pork schnitzel induces the largest environmental impact for most environmental impact indicators.
Elsevier, The Lancet Planetary Health, Volume 5, November 2021
COVID-19 is disrupting and transforming the world. We argue that transformations catalysed by this pandemic should be used to improve human and planetary health and wellbeing. This paradigm shift requires decision makers and policy makers to go beyond building back better, by nesting the economic domain of sustainable development within social and environmental domains.
Elsevier, Transportation Research Interdisciplinary Perspectives, Volume 13, March 2022
Telecommuting has become a dominant professional experience for many Canadian business and workers due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Telecommuting has several benefits that are separate from COVID-19. Two prevalent changes have been in regard to telecommuting and online food buying habits, both of which impact social wellbeing as a dimension of social sustainability. We discuss two exploratory surveys on the perception of telecommuting and food e-commerce.
Elsevier, Chest, Volume 161, January 2022
Background: Ozone effects on lung function are particularly important to understand in the context of the air pollution-health outcomes epidemiologic literature, given the complex relationships between ozone and other air pollutants with known lung function effects. Research Question: What has been learned about the association between ozone exposures and lung function from epidemiology studies published from 2013 through 2020?
Elsevier, One Earth, Volume 4, 17 December 2021
Behavioral science approaches to promoting sustainable action have mainly focused on cognitive processes, whereas the role of emotions has received comparably little attention. However, emotions have a great but currently not fully exploited potential to contribute to a sustainable behavior change. In this perspective, we summarize recent research emphasizing the central and indispensable role of emotion in human thinking and judgment.
Elsevier, Journal of Thoracic Oncology, Volume 17, January 2022
Screening with low-dose computed tomography of high-risk individuals with a smoking history reduces lung cancer mortality. Current screening guidelines and eligibility criteria can miss more than 50% of lung cancers, and in some geographic areas, such as East Asia, a large proportion of the missed lung cancers are in never-smokers. Although randomized trials revealed the benefits of screening for people who smoke, these trials generally excluded never-smokers. Thus, the feasibility and effectiveness of lung cancer screening of individuals who never smoked are uncertain.

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