Elimination of Violence against Women 2021

Women's rights activists have observed November 25th as a day against gender-based violence since 1981. This date was selected to honour the Mirabal sisters, three political activists from the Dominican Republic who were brutally murdered in 1960 by order of the country’s ruler, Rafael Trujillo (1930-1961). November 25th also marks the beginning of 16 Days of Activism against Gender-Based Violence which ends on December 10th, Human Rights Day. This annual campaign is used by individuals and organisations around the world to call for the prevention and elimination of violence against women and girls.

Despite the adoption of the Convention of the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW) by the UN General Assembly in 1979, violence against women and girls remains a pervasive problem worldwide. To date, only two out of three countries have outlawed domestic violence, while 37 countries worldwide still exempt rape perpetrators from prosecution if they are married to or eventually marry the victim and 49 countries currently have no laws protecting women from domestic violence.

To mark this event, Elsevier presents a curated, freely available collection of journal articles and book chapters to highlight the urgent need to end violence against women and girls.

Elsevier,

Handbook of Loss Prevention and Crime Prevention, Sixth Edition, 2020, Pages 405-411

This chapter advances SDGs 3, 5 and 16 by offering a call to action to everybody to understand domestic abuse, impacts and factors involved, and psychological needs.
Elsevier,

Encyclopedia of Violence, Peace, & Conflict, Second Edition, 2008, Pages 859-868

This article advances SDGs 5 and 16 by discussing the influence that gender studies has and can have on thinking about violence, nonviolence, war and peace, and conflict transformation.
Elsevier,

Encyclopedia of Violence, Peace, & Conflict, Second Edition, 2008, Pages 1914-1920

This article advances SDG 3 and 16 by discussing adult and adolescent sexual assault among female victims and male perpetrators including definitions and research.
Elsevier,

Encyclopedia of Violence, Peace, & Conflict, Second Edition, 2008, Pages 2456-2467

This article advances SDGs 5 and 16 by examining the distinct impact that war has on women because of their gender, the various ways that women respond to war and the roles they play, the major debates within this field of study, and, finally, gender inequality as a cause of violence in peacetime and wartime.
Elsevier,

Global Emergency of Mental Disorders, 2021, Pages 353-364

This book chapter advances SDG 3 and 16 by explaining the risk factors that are specific to women with regard to mental disorders. These risk factors include socioeconomic disadvantages, violence, low income and income inequality, lower social status, and responsibilities of caring for children and family members.
Elsevier,

How Sex and Gender Impact Clinical Practice, An Evidence-Based Guide to Patient Care, 2021, Pages 277-287

This book chapter advances SDGs 3 and 16 by examining three issues that are considered important public health issues as well as common patient problems—intimate partner violence, access to healthcare, and immunization—with a focus on sex and gender based medicine.

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