Human Rights Day 2021

UN Human Rights Day 2021 campaign photo

Human Rights Day is observed every year on 10 December — the day the United Nations General Assembly adopted, in 1948, the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR). The UDHR is a milestone document, which proclaims the inalienable rights that everyone is entitled to as a human being - regardless of race, colour, religion, sex, language, political or other opinion, national or social origin, property, birth or other status. Available in more than 500 languages, it is the most translated document in the world. To create awareness, Elsevier has compiled a Special Issue of journal articles which are freely available to read. 

Elsevier, The Lancet, Volume 397, 6 February 2021
The nature of armed conflict throughout the world is intensely dynamic. Consequently, the protection of non-combatants and the provision of humanitarian services must continually adapt to this changing conflict environment. Complex political affiliations, the systematic use of explosive weapons and sexual violence, and the use of new communication technology, including social media, have created new challenges for humanitarian actors in negotiating access to affected populations and security for their own personnel.
Elsevier, iScience, Volume 24, 22 October 2021
Low- and moderate-income (LMI) households remain less likely to adopt rooftop solar photovoltaics (PV) than higher-income households. A transient period of inequitable adoption is common among emerging technologies but stakeholders are calling for an accelerated transition to equitable rooftop PV adoption. To date, researchers have focused on demand-side drivers of PV adoption inequity, but supply-side factors could also play a role. Here, we use quote data to explore whether PV installers implement income-targeted marketing and the extent to which such strategies drive adoption inequity.
Elsevier, The Lancet Planetary Health, Volume 5, August 2021
Almost four decades of climate science have not yet led to transformative policy change at the pace and scale required to confront the climate crisis. Colleagues in the planetary health community attribute much potential to framing climate change as human health issue in order to create greater impact on policy makers. In this Personal View, we discuss the promise and limitations of this approach by drawing on insights from political science and public policy with regards to the complexity of these contentious policy issues.
Photograph of a young cobalt miner indebted to a mining boss in the Democratic Republic of the Congo
Elsevier, Energy Research and Social Science, Volume 77, July 2021
Globally those in slavery, though small in absolute numbers (est. 40.2 million), contribute disproportionately to environmental destruction and carbon emissions. If modern slaves were a country, they would be the third largest emitter of carbon dioxide in the world, after China and the United States. Concurrently, anthropogenic changes to the global ecosystem have significant impacts on human life, creating vulnerability and displacement that drive modern slavery.
Elsevier, Progress in Disaster Science, Volume 10, April 2021
The COVID-19 pandemic has uncovered and intensified existing societal inequalities. People on the move and residents of urban slums and informal settlements are among some of the most affected groups in the Global South. Given the current living conditions of migrants, the WHO guidelines on how to prevent COVID-19 (such as handwashing, physical distancing and working from home) are challenging to nearly impossible in informal settlements.
Cartoon showing how humanitarian response affects population characteristics and trafficking risk.
Elsevier, International Journal of Disaster Risk Reduction, Volume 60, 15 June 2021
Thailand's flood of 2011 was devastating for the communities and inhabitants of the country, affecting approximately 13 million people and causing damages totaling THB 1.43 trillion (46.5 billion USD). The presence of a natural hazards disaster such as this can magnify individuals' vulnerability to human trafficking, or mitigate it depending on the disaster risk reduction practices of the surrounding community.
Map showing demographics of survey respondents.
Elsevier, Data in Brief, Volume 39, December 2021
The data in this article investigated the extent of human rights awareness in the seven States comprising the Northwest geopolitical zone of Nigeria and its relationship with the characteristics of the population in the light of limited human rights claims in the region. The data was obtained from 780 respondents using stratified and systematic random sampling techniques using with the help of a structured questionnaire.
Elsevier, Heliyon, Volume 7, August 2021
Objectives: This study explored midwives' and Jordanian and Syrian women's perceptions towards family planning (FP) counseling and the process of FP decision making mechanism to provide evidence for expanding the access and improving the quality and utilization of FP services in Jordan. Methods: Explorative qualitative study that purposively recruited 24 women for 4 focus group discussions (FDGs) and 17 midwives for in-depth interviews from two governorates in Jordan. The transcribed narratives were subjected to deductive content analysis.
Elsevier, Asian Nursing Research, Volume 15, December 2021
Purpose: The purpose of this study was to explore male nurses’ experiences of workplace gender discrimination and sexual harassment in South Korea. Methods: Phenomenological qualitative methodology exploring male nurses’ experiences was employed to collect data, and thematic analysis of the data was conducted. Research subjects were recruited by convenience and snowball sampling. Ten male nurses participated in individual in-depth interviews via mobile phone. Data were collected from June 15 to July 24, 2020.

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