International Day for the Elimination of Racial Discrimination 2022

March 21st is acknowledged and celebrated worldwide as the International Day for the Elimination of Racial Discrimination. It aims to encourage society to disown and disregard racial discrimination. The UN resolution (A/RES/2142 (XXI)) that was adopted on 26 October 1966, declares that any kind of racial discrimination is condemnable and the global community is determined to eliminate racial discrimination from its roots wherever it exists in the world. The International Day for the Elimination of Racial Discrimination is observed annually on the day the police in Sharpeville, South Africa, opened fire and killed 69 people at a peaceful demonstration against apartheid "pass laws" in 1960.

Elsevier,

The Lancet Regional Health - Western Pacific, Volume 13, August 2021

This study supports SDG 3 and 10 by showing that the risk of dementia and the modifiable risk factors for dementia vary substantially among the different ethnic groups in New Zealand (European, Māori, Asian, and Pacific people), indicating that dementia prevention efforts should be tailored to each ethnic group, to account for these differences.
Elsevier,

The Lancet Global Health, Volume 9, July 2021

This Comment article advances SDG 3 and 10 by making a case for bridging language barriers in global health research and overcoming the colonial legacy of language in global health (from the naming of infectious diseases to the use of global health terms with problematic historical connotations), with the aim of facilitating knowledge co-production and more equal research partnerships.
Elsevier,

The Lancet Child and Adolescent Health, Volume 5, July 2021

This study supports SDG 3 and 10 by highlighting an overrepresentation of Black children and adolescents in involuntary psychiatric hospitalisations, which may establish potentially lifelong negative mental health treatment trajectories and contribute to cycles of health inequality that persist in later life.
Elsevier,

The Lancet Global Health, Volume 9, July 2021

This Comment article advances SDG 3 and 10 by highlighting the disproportionate imbalance of power in global health research, and calls for reforms in publishing and academia to ensure greater representation of global health researchers from low-income and middle-income countries in prestigious, high-impact journals.
Elsevier,

eClinicalMedicine, Volume 37, July 2021

This study supports SDGs 3 and 10 by investigating the role of genetic ancestry in ethnic disparities in type 2 diabetes, and interactions with socioeconomic deprivation. The effects of environmental risk factors were found to differ among ancestry groups, suggesting the need for group-specific interventions.
Elsevier,

eClinicalMedicine, Volume 37, July 2021

This Research paper supports SDGs 3 and 10 by characterising racial disparities among pregnant women with SARS-CoV-2. The findings showed that Black women were more likely to have occupational exposure to SARS-CoV-2 than White women and that Black women with SARS-CoV-2 during pregnancy were more likely to have a preterm delivery.
Elsevier,

The Lancet Diabetes and Endocrinology, Volume 9, July 2021

This article supports SGDs 3 and 10 by identifying ethnicity-specific body-mass index cutoffs for obesity based on type 2 diabetes risk-equivalence to the cutoff in White populations. The findings suggest ethnicity-specific body-mass index cutoffs are needed to optimise prevention and management of type 2 diabetes.
Elsevier,

eClinicalMedicine, Volume 36, June 2021

This Comment article supports SDG 3 and 10 by underscoring the need to address systemic racism in order to achieve health equity, and emphasising the need to develop more nuanced metrics to more broadly document and measure the extent and impact of systemic racism on the health of affected communities.
Elsevier,

EClinicalMedicine, Volume 36, June 2021

This Research paper supports SDGs 3 and 10 by providing national US estimates of the association between fatal police violence and pregnancy loss. Fatalities were measured within core-based statistical areas (census-defined urban areas). The findings showed that for each additional police-related fatality during the first 6 months of gestation there was a decrease in the total number of live births within the area. There was a decrease in births among Black women, but not among White women.

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