International Day for the Elimination of Violence against Women 2020

Violence against women and girls is one of the most widespread violations of human rights. 

Global estimates published by WHO indicate that about 1 in 3 (35%) of women worldwide have experienced either physical and/or sexual intimate partner violence or non-partner sexual violence in their lifetime. Most of this violence is intimate partner violence. Worldwide, almost one third (30%) of women who have been in a relationship have experienced physical and/or sexual violence by their intimate partner and as many as 38% of all murders of women are committed by intimate partners. Yet to date, only two out of three countries have outlawed domestic violence, while 37 countries worldwide still exempt rape perpetrators from prosecution if they are married to or eventually marry the victim. Furthermore, 49 countries currently have no laws protecting women from domestic violence.

Women's rights activists have observed November 25th as a day against gender-based violence since 1981. This date was selected to honour the Mirabal sisters, three political activists from the Dominican Republic who were brutally murdered in 1960 by order of the country’s ruler, Rafael Trujillo (1930-1961). November 25th also marks the beginning of 16 Days of Activism against Gender-Based Violence which end on December 10th, Human Rights Day. This annual campaign is used by individuals and organisations around the world to call for the prevention and elimination of violence against women and girls.

To mark this event, Elsevier presents a curated, open access collection of 52 journal articles and book chapters to highlight the urgent need to end violence against women and girls.

 

 

 

Elsevier, The Lancet Global Health, Volume 8, February 2020
Background: Innovative solutions are required to provide mental health support at scale in low-resource humanitarian contexts. We aimed to assess the effectiveness of a facilitator-guided, group-based, self-help intervention (Self-Help Plus) to reduce psychological distress in female refugees. Methods: We did a cluster randomised trial in rural refugee settlements in northern Uganda. Participants were female South Sudanese refugees with at least moderate levels of psychological distress (cutoff ≥5 on the Kessler 6).
Elsevier, Forensic Science International: Synergy, Volume 1, 2019
Sexual and gender based violence (SGBV) is notoriously difficult to investigate and prosecute. SGBV occurs in varied contexts and requires flexibility in the investigative approach in order to develop a strong evidence base to enable successful prosecutions. In this paper we focus on the need for innovation and development of training protocols for gathering testimonial and forensic evidence in SGBV cases, particularly in low resource environments, such as developing countries, displaced communities, and conflict and post-conflict societies.
Elsevier, Forensic Science International: Synergy, Volume 1, 2019
Sexual and Gender Based Violence (SGBV) in Kenya is highly complex requiring a multi-sectoral approach for comprehensive management. This complexity is worsened by the acceptance of Sexual Violence within a patriarchal society, harmful traditional and cultural practices, breakdown of law and order especially during electoral periods, all heightened by abject poverty. There are numerous programs on interventions costing millions in local and foreign currency, however grave gaps still exist at key levels across all sectors even after years of continued intervention.
Elsevier,

Forensic Science International: Reports, Volume 2, December 2020, 100053

In this brief perspective piece, a rural sexual assault nurse examiner (SANE) program is described in the hopes that dissemination will lead to increased numbers of rural SANEs, increased reporting of sexual assaults in rural and underserved communities, increased prosecution rates of sexual assault perpetrators, and program sustainability through the provision of a nurse-centered approach to training and support. This article contributes SDGs 3, 5, 9, and 16.
Elsevier,

Forensic Science International: Reports, Volume 2, December 2020, 100121

Contributing to SDGs 3, 5 and 16, this paper examines the demographic profile of female victims with intellectual disablities who were sexually assaulted and the characteristics of sexual assault.
Elsevier,

Forensic Science International: Reports, Volume 2, December 2020, 100089

Advancing SDGs 3, 5 and 16, this article discusses increased risk of family violence during COVID-19 pandemic and suggests that collaborations between human welfare and animal welfare agencies, expanding community partnerships, and informing the public of the great importance of reporting any concerns of abuse are all critical at this time.
Elsevier,

Explaining Suicide: Patterns, Motivations, and What Notes Reveal, 2017, Pages 51-71

Contributing to SDGs 3 and 5, this chapter examines interpersonal relationships as a motivation for suicide.
Elsevier,

Adolescent Dating Violence: Theory, Research, and Prevention, 2018, Pages 191-214

Contributing to SDGs 3 and 5, this chapter discusses youth dating homicides based on the work of domestic violence death review committees and identify recommendations from individual cases and overall patterns of findings from these deaths
Elsevier,

Adolescent Dating Violence: Theory, Research, and Prevention, 2018, Pages 25-51

Advancing SDGs 3 and 5, this chapter discusses the theories behind partner abuse and the implications of these for prevention planning.
Elsevier,

Adolescent Dating Violence: Theory, Research, and Prevention, 2018, Pages 381-414

Contributing to SDGs 3 and 5, this chapter reviews the evidence from both high- as well as LMIC regarding the effectiveness of interventions to address intimate partner and sexual violence among adolescents, including school and community-based approaches.

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