International Day for the Elimination of Violence against Women 2020

Violence against women and girls is one of the most widespread violations of human rights. 

Global estimates published by WHO indicate that about 1 in 3 (35%) of women worldwide have experienced either physical and/or sexual intimate partner violence or non-partner sexual violence in their lifetime. Most of this violence is intimate partner violence. Worldwide, almost one third (30%) of women who have been in a relationship have experienced physical and/or sexual violence by their intimate partner and as many as 38% of all murders of women are committed by intimate partners. Yet to date, only two out of three countries have outlawed domestic violence, while 37 countries worldwide still exempt rape perpetrators from prosecution if they are married to or eventually marry the victim. Furthermore, 49 countries currently have no laws protecting women from domestic violence.

Women's rights activists have observed November 25th as a day against gender-based violence since 1981. This date was selected to honour the Mirabal sisters, three political activists from the Dominican Republic who were brutally murdered in 1960 by order of the country’s ruler, Rafael Trujillo (1930-1961). November 25th also marks the beginning of 16 Days of Activism against Gender-Based Violence which end on December 10th, Human Rights Day. This annual campaign is used by individuals and organisations around the world to call for the prevention and elimination of violence against women and girls.

To mark this event, Elsevier presents a curated, open access collection of 52 journal articles and book chapters to highlight the urgent need to end violence against women and girls.

 

 

 

Elsevier,

Adolescent Dating Violence: Theory, Research, and Prevention, 2018, Pages 437-466

Advancing SDGs 3 and 5, this chapter reviews college-based dating violence prevention programming and examines the limitations of current research practices, as well as the legal, health and policy implications.
Elsevier,

Cross-Cultural Family Research and Practice, 2020, Pages 249-285

Efforts to provide a normed standard for what constitutes intimate partner violence, child abuse, and neglect have clashed with attempts to recognize the impact of cultural variability on the experiences of family maltreatment. Contributing to SDGs 3 and 5, this chapter takes on this challenging intersection by answering vital questions about the operationalization of intimate partner violence and child maltreatment, including how to integrate the need for universal standards with considerations of cultural context.
Elsevier,

The Psychology of Gender and Health: Conceptual and Applied Global Concerns, 2017, Pages 199-229

Violence against women is a growing area of study in development because it is directly related to the health and psychological consequences associated with victims. Contributing to SDGs 3 and 5, this chapter provides a summary of the main strategies that have been proposed to combat this problem by different international and European organizations, with particular attention to the specific application that has been carried out in Spain.
Elsevier,

Sexual Assault Risk Reduction and Resistance: Theory, Research, and Practice, 2018, Pages 175-193

Researchers have found a variety of effective treatments for individuals with sexual assault histories, particularly for those presenting with posttraumatic stress disorder, depending on their mental health presentations. However, many individuals may not be aware of these resources. Contributing to SDGs 3 and 5, this chapter discusses how sexual assault risk reduction and resistance education programming is an excellent setting to provide individuals with these resources for themselves or to share with friends and/or family.
Elsevier,

Sexual Assault Risk Reduction and Resistance: Theory, Research, and Practice, 2018, Pages 245-289

Three different programs designed to increase women’s ability to recognize, avoid, and resist sexual assault have demonstrated success in reducing sexual violence in college populations.Contributing to SDGs 3 and 5, this chapter describes and analyses these three programs (the Ohio University Sexual Assault Risk Reduction Program, the Enhanced Assess, Acknowledge, Act Sexual Assault Resistance Program, and the Self-Defense from the Inside Out program).
Elsevier,

Sexual Assault Risk Reduction and Resistance: Theory, Research, and Practice, 2018, Pages 291-308

Advancing SDGs 3 and 5, this chapter provides an overview of the global prevalence of sexual violence and a summary of empirically supported approaches to reduce risk of sexual violence and identifies promising directions for future research.
Elsevier,

Preventing Domestic Homicides: Lessons Learned from Tragedies, 2020, Pages 15-37

Linked to SDGs 3 and 5, this chapter examines domestic homicides of older women through the lens of ageism.
Elsevier,

The Psychology of Criminal and Antisocial Behavior: Victim and Offender Perspectives, 2017, Pages 343-359

Contributing to SDGs 3 and 5, this chapter discusses the importance that those dealing with domestic violence are well trained to recognise the warning signs, behaviors, and circumstances that are associated with domestic violence and its various incarnations, as well as the psychological, social, and physical consequences of this form of victimization.
Elsevier,

Forensic Psychology of Spousal Violence, 2016, Pages 33-43

There have been various ways on how to address the practice of violence in a spousal environment. Linked to SDGs 3 and 5, this chapter presents an approach to violence that is split into three paths, namely physical, psychological and sexual violence. Psychological violence includes stalking, financial abuse and social isolation. However, the authors emphasise that these are just categories of study and analysis and in real life, they coexist within aggression.
Elsevier,

Forensic Psychology of Spousal Violence, 2016, Pages 45-59

Spousal violence carries within itself a set of consequences that go beyond bruises, hematomas or other physical injuries. However, very little attention has been given to the psychological impact of spousal violence due to a generated common idea that violence is only serious when it leaves bruises or exposed fractures. Furthering SDGs 3 and 5, this chapter emphasises the impact that violence represents in terms of mood, anxiety and even post-traumatic stress.

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