International Women's Day Special Issue

In recognition of International Women’s Day (IWD), Elsevier, a global leader in information analytics specializing in science and health, has launched a free access special issue of curated content focused on women and gender issues in health and sciences.

Consisting of journal articles and book chapters supporting the United Nation’s Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), this free resource is intended to further new research and to raise awareness around this year’s theme for International Women’s Day: #ChoosetoChallenge, as well as the UN’s focus for IWD this year: Women in leadership: Achieving an equal future in a COVID-19 world.

Elsevier, International Journal of Nursing Studies, Volume 93, May 2019
Aims and objectives/background: Nursing is a predominantly female profession. This is reflected in the demographic of nursing around the world. Some authors have noted that despite being a gendered profession men are still advantaged in terms of pay and opportunity. The aim of this study was to examine if the so called glass escalator in which men are advantaged in female professionals still exists.
Elsevier, Computer Law and Security Review, Volume 36, April 2020
With female names, voices and characters, artificially intelligent Virtual Personal Assistants such as Alexa, Cortana, and Siri appear to be decisively gendered female. Through an exploration of the various facets of gendering at play in the design of Siri, Alexa and Cortana, we argue that this gendering of VPAs as female may pose a societal harm, insofar as they reproduce normative assumptions about the role of women as submissive and secondary to men. In response, this article turns to examine the potential role and scope of data protection law as one possible solution to this problem.
Elsevier, European Management Journal, Volume 36, February 2018
In the last decade, the number of women on corporate boards has increased slightly, but the prevailing minority status of women directors implies that they will continue to face social barriers. While prior research has largely focused on explaining social barriers (e.g., being categorized as an out-group member) to increase diversity and its negative consequences, how boards can avoid these obstacles remains unclear.
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Jenkins et Al. Application of sex and gender health: A practical framework. In: Jenkins et al, How Sex and Gender Impact Clinical Practice, Academic Press, 2021, Pages 3-8.

This book chapter advances SDGs 3 and 5 by explaining that the use of a sex- and gender-based framework in the clinical practice of medicine will improve the care of both women and men, and likely have a positive impact on health outcomes.
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Three Facets of Public Health and Paths to Improvements: Behavior, Culture, and Environment, 2020, Pages 261-294

This book chapter advances SDG 5, 8 and 10 by explaining how the outsized role of women caregivers is attributed to historical, cultural, and social perspectives on gender and caregiving that perpetuate the gender inequalities in unpaid care work. In this chapter, the authors analyze women in unpaid work considering two regions: The United States and the Middle East and North Africa (MENA). 
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Principles of Gender-Specific Medicine (Third Edition), Academic Press, 2017, Pages 435-441.

This chapter advances SDG 3 and 5 by exploring some of the factors associated with high mortality rates in Indian girls including in the 5 to 14 age group.
Elsevier,

Principles of Gender-Specific Medicine (Third Edition), Academic Press, 2017, Pages 183-201.

This book chapter advances SDG 5 and 10 by showing that gender differences in emotion experience and expression represent some of the most robust gender stereotypes worldwide.
Elsevier,

Principles of Gender-Specific Medicine (Third Edition), Academic Press, 2017, Pages 203-217.

This book chapter advances SDG 3 and 5 by describing how autism research and diagnostic practices have been challenged in terms of androcentric assumptions and biased assessment practices, suggesting that methods are insensitive to gender differences on the spectrum. It is now recognized that girls on the autism spectrum may present differently from boys and hence their identification and subsequent needs may go unrecognized.
Elsevier,

Sex Differences in Cardiac Diseases, Elsevier, 2021, Pages 481-503

This book chapter advances SDG 3 and 5 by explaining how women have an increased risk of certain chronic autoimmune inflammatory disorders (CIDs). All aspects of the heart’s structure and function may be affected by the autoimmune disease.

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