World Alzheimer's Day 2021: The Power of Knowledge

World Alzheimer's Day is an international campaign organised by Alzheimer's Disease International to raise awareness and highlight issues faced by people affected by dementia. It takes place every year on September 21st and is the focus of World Alzheimer's Month.

Dementia is one of the biggest challenges we face, with nearly 50 million people living with dementia worldwide. Yet 2 out of every 3 people globally believe there is little or no understanding of dementia in their countries.The impact of World Alzheimer's Month is growing, but the stigmatisation and misinformation that surrounds dementia remains a global problem. To tackle this challenge, we need to collaborate and share best practice with one another.

In support of this year’s theme – ‘Know dementia, know Alzheimer's’ - Elsevier presents a curated, open access collection of over 70 journal articles and book chapters focused on shining a light on the warning signs of dementia and the importance of a timely diagnosis.

Elsevier, Journal of Steroid Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Volume 205, January 2021
Background and Purpose: Altered cholesterol metabolism is associated with increased risk of neurodegeneration and in particular with the development of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Here, we investigate whether non-cholesterol sterols and oxysterols in the central nervous system are associated with (i) the presence of cerebral AD pathology, (ii) distinct aspects of AD pathology, i.e. amyloid pathology, neuronal injury, and tau pathology, and (iii) cognitive decline over time.
Elsevier, Frontiers in Neuroendocrinology, Volume 60, January 2021
Women represent ⅔ of the cases of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Current research has focused on differential risks to explain higher rates of AD in women. However, factors that reduce risk for AD, like cognitive/brain reserve, are less well explored. We asked: what is known about sex and gender differences in how reserve mitigates risk for AD?
Elsevier, Medical Image Analysis, Volume 67, January 2021
The enormous social and economic cost of Alzheimer's disease (AD) has driven a number of neuroimaging investigations for early detection and diagnosis. Towards this end, various computational approaches have been applied to longitudinal imaging data in subjects with Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI), as serial brain imaging could increase sensitivity for detecting changes from baseline, and potentially serve as a diagnostic biomarker for AD. However, current state-of-the-art brain imaging diagnostic methods have limited utility in clinical practice due to the lack of robust predictive power.
Elsevier, Journal for Nurse Practitioners, Volume 16, 1 November 2020
This study explored an established primary care–based dementia pathway in New Zealand (NZ) and nurse practitioner dementia diagnosis and care in 1 small United States state that has adopted a value-based delivery model. Central to the NZ model was the education of primary care providers, clear delineation of specialists’ support and referral pathways, and routine and predictable family carer respite. The US respondents reported that the essential resources necessary to support the diagnosis and management of dementia were lacking.
Elsevier, Cortex, Volume 132, November 2020
It has recently been proposed that short-term memory (STM) binding deficits might be an important feature of Alzheimer's disease (AD), providing a potential avenue for earlier detection of this disorder. By contrast, work in Parkinson's disease (PD), using different tasks, has suggested that the STM impairment in this condition is characterised by increased random guessing, possibly due to fluctuating attention.
Elsevier, Journal of the American Medical Directors Association, Volume 21, November 2020
In April, 2019, the Alzheimer's Association Dementia Care Provider Roundtable convened to discuss common challenges faced when implementing person-centered, non-pharmacological practices in long-term care and other settings that provide care and programs for persons living with dementia, and to develop relevant, specific guidance from the perspective of administrative leaders from 23 long-term and community-based care provider organizations (representing home, community-based, and residential care).
Elsevier, Cortex, Volume 131, October 2020
Due to advances in the early detection of Alzheimer's disease (AD) biomarkers including beta-amyloid (Aβ), neuropsychological measures that are sensitive to concurrent, subtle changes in cognition are critically needed. Story recall tasks have shown sensitivity to early memory declines in persons with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and early stage dementia, as well as in persons with autosomal dominantly inherited AD up to 10 years prior to a dementia diagnosis. However, the evidence is inconclusive regarding relationships between evidence of Aβ and story recall measures.
Elsevier, Physiology and Behavior, Volume 223, 1 September 2020
Alzheimer's disease (AD) is associated with cognitive deficits and behavioral disorders such as anxiety and depression. Recent clinical and experimental studies have demonstrated that swimming exercise could be a potential therapy for cognitive and behavioral disorders. The prevalence of anxiety and depression is increasing among patients with AD; hence, further studies are needed to develop therapies for these behavioral abnormalities.
Elsevier, Public Health, Volume 185, August 2020
Objectives: ‘Dementia Friends’ is a programme used to raise awareness of dementia, developed by the Alzheimer's Society, which has been delivered across the UK to diverse populations, including adolescents. However, there is little evidence available with regards to adolescents' perceptions of the programme and its impact. This study aims to explore this in a group of adolescents from the south of England. Study design: Focus group discussions. Methods: Thirty adolescents aged between 11 and 16 years were recruited from two schools in East Sussex, England.

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