World Alzheimer's Day 2021: The Power of Knowledge

World Alzheimer's Day is an international campaign organised by Alzheimer's Disease International to raise awareness and highlight issues faced by people affected by dementia. It takes place every year on September 21st and is the focus of World Alzheimer's Month.

Dementia is one of the biggest challenges we face, with nearly 50 million people living with dementia worldwide. Yet 2 out of every 3 people globally believe there is little or no understanding of dementia in their countries.The impact of World Alzheimer's Month is growing, but the stigmatisation and misinformation that surrounds dementia remains a global problem. To tackle this challenge, we need to collaborate and share best practice with one another.

In support of this year’s theme – ‘Know dementia, know Alzheimer's’ - Elsevier presents a curated, open access collection of over 70 journal articles and book chapters focused on shining a light on the warning signs of dementia and the importance of a timely diagnosis.

Elsevier, Journal of Cleaner Production, Volume , 2020
Background: Evidences of infectious pathogens in Alzheimer's disease (AD) brains may suggest a deteriorated innate immune system in AD pathophysiology. We previously demonstrated reduced salivary lactoferrin (Lf) levels, one of the major antimicrobial proteins, in AD patients. Methods: To assess the clinical utility of salivary Lf for AD diagnosis, we examine the relationship between salivary Lf and cerebral amyloid-β (Aβ) load using amyloid-Positron-Emission Tomography (PET) neuroimaging, in two different cross-sectional cohorts including patients with different neurodegenerative disorders.
Elsevier, EBioMedicine, Volume 67, May 2021
Background: The pathological changes in Alzheimer's Disease (AD) and other neurodegenerative disorders begin decades prior to their clinical expression. However, the clinical diagnosis of neurodegenerative dementias is not straightforward. Lactoferrin is an iron-binding, antimicrobial glycoprotein with a plethora of functions, including acting as an important immune modulator and by having a bacteriocidic effect. Two previous studies indicated that salivary lactoferrin could differentiate between neurodegenerative dementias.
Elsevier, EClinicalMedicine, Volume 32, February 2021
Background: Sleep disturbances may increase risks of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and other dementias. Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is usually associated with lower urinary tract symptoms, including nocturia, and thereby disturbed sleep. We examined if men with BPH are at increased risk of AD and all-cause dementia. Methods: In a Danish nationwide cohort (1996–2016), we identified 297,026 men with BPH, defined by inpatient or outpatient hospital diagnosis or by BPH-related surgical or medical treatment, and 1,107,176 men from the general population matched by birth year.
Elsevier, The Lancet Healthy Longevity, Volume 1, December 2020
Background: Circadian disturbances are commonly seen in people with Alzheimer's disease and have been reported in individuals without symptoms of dementia but with Alzheimer's pathology. We aimed to assess the temporal relationship between circadian disturbances and Alzheimer's progression. Methods: We did a prospective cohort study of 1401 healthy older adults (aged >59 years) enrolled in the Rush Memory and Aging Project (Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL, USA) who had been followed up for up to 15 years.
Elsevier, EClinicalMedicine, Volume 28, November 2020
Background: The aim of this study is to use classification methods to predict future onset of Alzheimer's disease in cognitively normal subjects through automated linguistic analysis. Methods: To study linguistic performance as an early biomarker of AD, we performed predictive modeling of future diagnosis of AD from a cognitively normal baseline of Framingham Heart Study participants. The linguistic variables were derived from written responses to the cookie-theft picture-description task.
Elsevier, EBioMedicine, Volume 59, September 2020
Background: Cholinergic neuronal loss is one of the hallmarks of AD related neurodegeneration; however, preclinical promise of α7 nAChR drugs failed to translate into humans. CHRFAM7A, a uniquely human fusion gene, is a negative regulator of α7 nAChR and was unaccounted for in preclinical models. Methods: Molecular methods: Function of CHRFAM7A alleles was studied in vitro in two disease relevant phenotypic readouts: electrophysiology and Aβ uptake. Genome edited human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) were used as a model system with the human context.
Elsevier, EBioMedicine, Volume 59, September 2020
Background: Recently, we reported that patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) harbor specific signature of bacteria in their gut and that a modified Mediterranean ketogenic diet (MMKD) improves Alzheimer's disease (AD) markers in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and the signatures of gut bacteria. However, other microbial population such as gut fungi (mycobiome) in relation to MCI/AD pathology, gut bacteria and diet remain unknown.
Elsevier, EBioMedicine, Volume 58, August 2020
Background: Microglia, the brain's principal immune cell, are increasingly implicated in Alzheimer's disease (AD), but the molecular interfaces through which these cells contribute to amyloid beta (Aβ)-related neurodegeneration are unclear. We recently identified microglial contributions to the homeostatic and disease-associated modulation of perineuronal nets (PNNs), extracellular matrix structures that enwrap and stabilize neuronal synapses, but whether PNNs are altered in AD remains controversial.
Elsevier,

EClinicalMedicine, Volume 38, 2021, 100988

This cross-sectional study examined whether levels of soluble Aβ42 are higher in amyloid-positive normal cognition (NC) individuals compared to mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and Alzheimer's disease.

Pages