World Mental Health Day 2022

World Mental Health Day was observed for the first time on 10 October 1992. The day, officially commemorated every year on October 10th, aims to raise awareness in the global community about the critical mental health agendas – with a unifying voice through collaboration with various partners – to take action and to create lasting change. It was started as an annual activity of the World Federation for Mental Health by the then Deputy Secretary-General Richard Hunter. In 1994, at the suggestion of then Secretary-General Eugene Brody, a theme for the Day was used for the first time. It was “Improving the Quality of Mental Health Services throughout the World.” Within three years, the Day had become a valuable occasion for interested government departments, organization and committed individuals to arrange programs to focus on aspects of mental health care. World Mental Health Day celebrates awareness for the global community in an empathetic way, with a unifying voice, helping people feel hopeful by empowering them to take action and create lasting change. This year's theme is "Make mental health & well-being for all a global priority".

Elsevier,

Cancer Treatment and Research Communications, Volume 32, January 2022

This article focuses on the risk of psychological distress and the quality of life of the primary caregiver of patients with cancer and identifies steps that may be taken for supportive management.
Graphical abstract of article
Elsevier,

Translational Oncology, Volume 15, January 2022

This article analyzes the correlation between the mental stress and severe psychological impacts, specifically chronic stress, that patients with breast cancer experience and reviews the previous research on the correlation between chronic stress and the occurrence and development of breast cancer.
Elsevier,

IBRO Neuroscience Reports, Volume 11, December 2021

Depression is a serious mental and mood disorder with global health and economic burden. Nutrition through the application of necessary food classes or herbs as well as their phytochemicals, may go a long way to effectively manage depression. This nutritional strategy should be given more attention in research, assessment and treatment for those with depression and other mental illness in low income countries, especially in Africa.
Elsevier,

Public Health in Practice, Volume 2, November 2021

Looks at the mental health of the Black community in the USA in response to police brutality. Ties to reduced inequalities, peace and justice, good health and wellbeing for all.
Graphical abstract of article
Elsevier,

Current Research in Physiology, Volume 4, January 2021

Laughter therapy is a universal non-pharmacologic approach to reduce stress and anxiety. Laughter therapy can be used during COVID-19 pandemic as a useful supplementary therapy to reduce the mental health burden.
Elsevier,

Clinical Imaging, Volume 68, December 2020

Based on the responses of a nationwide survey, this article explores the significant impact that COVID 19 has had on radiologists across the nation and, in the context of SDG 3, the impact on their mental health.
Elsevier,

Clinical Breast Cancer, Volume 20, October 2020

This study aimed to analyze the psychological status in patients with breast cancer (BS) during the COVID-19 outbreak and observed high rates of anxiety, depression, distress, and insomnia. Special attention should be paid to the psychological status of patients with BC, especially those with poor general condition, treatment discontinuation, aggressive molecular subtypes, and metastatic BC.
Elsevier,

Mental Health and Physical Activity, Volume 18, March 2020

How physical activity improves mental health.
Elsevier, Behaviour Research and Therapy, Volume 44, January 2006
The present article presents and reviews the model of psychopathology and treatment underlying Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT). ACT is unusual in that it is linked to a comprehensive active basic research program on the nature of human language and cognition (Relational Frame Theory), echoing back to an earlier era of behavior therapy in which clinical treatments were consciously based on basic behavioral principles.

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