Stereotyping

Elsevier, Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, Volume 83, July 2019
Decades of research indicate that the traits we ascribe to people often depend on their race. Yet, the bulk of this research has not considered how racial stereotypes might also depend on other aspects of targets’ identities. To address this, researchers have begun to ask intersectional questions about racial stereotypes, such as whether they are applied in similar ways to men and women, or to children and adults. In the present studies, we examine whether men who are described as gay (vs. not) become de-racialized in the minds of perceivers. That is, we test whether gay (vs.
Young gay men are affected by HIV. Due to a lack of studies on these males, and that previous research notes youth's minimal healthcare seeking, we recruited young gay men at a gay men's STI testing clinic to explore their perceptions of care. Eight men participated in semi-structured interviews. Our results identified that, while our participants experienced stigma in some interactions, particularly when healthcare workers emphasized the probability of contracting HIV for gay men, overall they reported positive experiences with healthcare providers, particularly at the gay men's STI clinic.
The current paper addresses the nature of epistemic injustice as it may be experienced by persons with dementia. We describe how theoretical models of stigma align with the current model of epistemic injustice through a consideration of the concepts of ‘stereotype’ ‘prejudice’ and ‘discrimination’ shared by the two models. We draw on current understandings of dementia-related stigma to expand understandings of the epistemic injustice faced by persons with dementia.
A growing body of literature supports stigma and discrimination as fundamental causes of health disparities. Stigma and discrimination experienced by transgender people have been associated with increased risk for depression, suicide, and HIV. Transgender stigma and discrimination experienced in health care influence transgender people's health care access and utilization. Thus, understanding how stigma and discrimination manifest and function in health care encounters is critical to addressing health disparities for transgender people.