Survivor

Elsevier, International Journal of Women's Dermatology, Volume 7, December 2021
Photograph of an example of a tattoo on a human trafficking survivor
Human-trafficking survivors suffer significant physical, mental, and social health consequences, prompting them to seek health care services. Although there is research regarding identification protocols for human-trafficking victims, there is no framework outlining the dermatologic patterns of survivors of human trafficking. We sought to identify the dermatologic signs reported in human-trafficking victims to create a framework for dermatologists and the broader medical community to appropriately screen patients at risk.
Background: Research has revealed that survivors of childhood sexual abuse (CSA) have elevated sexual dysfunction and distress. Nevertheless, a vast majority of studies examining sexual dysfunction and distress among CSA survivors were conducted among women only, and the moderating role of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms between a history of CSA and sexual dysfunction and distress is yet to be investigated.
Objective: To examine the psychological distress and the associated predictor factors of the 2019 corona-virus disease (COVID-19) on survivors in the early convalescence in Shenzhen. Method: A survey questionnaire consisting of post-traumatic stress disorder self-rating scale (PTSD-SS), self-rating depression scale (SDS), and self-rating anxiety scale (SAS) was presented to COVID-19 survivors still in quarantine. Scores of each scale and subscale were dependent variables in the Mann-Whitney test and stepwise regression analysis.
International advocacy and evidence have been critical for shifting the pervasive issue of violence against women onto the health agenda. Guidelines and training packages, however, can be underpinned by Western principles of responding to individual survivors of violence and availability of specialist referral services, which may not be available in many countries.
The use of advanced technological solutions (“neurotechnologies”) can improve the clinical outcomes of neurorehabilitation after stroke. Here, Micera et al. propose a paradigm shift that is based on a deep understanding of the basic mechanisms of natural stroke recovery and technology-assisted neurorehabilitation to improve the clinical effectiveness of neurotechnology.