Chemicals and waste

Looking for the best in innovation
ICIS launches the search for the very best in innovation in the chemical industry. Now in their 14th year, the ICIS Innovation Awards seek to recognize and reward companies and individuals that show high levels of innovation in products and processes, as well as providing benefits to the environment and advancing progress towards sustainability. This award raises awareness of the benefits of innovation to the environment and supports SDG 9 Industry, Innovation and Infrastructure.
ICIS,

ICIS AFPM Supplement March 2017, pages 32-33

The rush to build large-scale petrochemical complexes in the US Gulf Coast area has encouraged companies to take a collaborative approach to finding and encouraging talented and skilled workers. The drive for growth cannot be achieved without creating decent work for all which advances SDG 8 Decent work and economic growth.
Elsevier,

Materials Today, Volume 20, Issue 2, 2017, Pages 67-73

In 2013 alone nearly 50 million tons of e-waste was generated worldwide. The United Nations’ STEP initiative has reported that e-waste is expected to grow by 33% over the next 4 years and by 2030 obsolete computer waste will reach 1,000 million tons. This electronic waste often contain toxic substances and nearly 80–85% of electronic products are directly disposed of in landfills or incinerators. The researchers suggest a new technique where circuit boards from electronics can be crushed into nanodust by a cryo-mill. The dust can then be easily separated into its component elements for recycling. The researchers intend it to replace the current process of e-waste into landfills and advances SDG 12.
ICIS,

Chemical Business, 5 January 2017

Carbon dioxide is becoming a valuable raw material for chemical industry
It is a sign of the maturity of the green and biobased chemicals sector that major producers and technology providers are making moves to join the entrepreneurs and start-ups that have been driving the technology forward. This positive trend supports the advancing of SDG 9 Industry, Innovation and Infrastructure, and SDG 7 Affordable and Clean Energy.
Elsevier,

Current Opinion in Chemical Engineering, Volume 17, Pages 22-34, August 2017

This paper deals with carbon capture and storage. It provides an overview of the different technologies that have been trialled and the technological gaps that need to be bridged to make this a viable option in the long term and therefore working towards SDG 7 (affordable and clean energy) and SDG 13 (climate action).
For many years, the negative environmental impact of plastic mass production was either ignored or underestimated. Fortunately, in the last two decades, strategies for the synthesis and degradation of plastics have been re-evaluated and have led to major advances in the development of (bio-) degradable and recyclable plastics. In her Catalysis article, Dr. García reiterates the environmental issues caused by plastics and gives a scholarly overview of both general and plastic-specific strategies for recycling. She concludes this piece by providing a perspective on the most promising options for making plastics more sustainable and a force for good rather than a source of pollution, supporting SDG 12. This article has triggered three reactions.
In a world where the demand for energy continues to rise and fossil-fuel reserves become more depleted each day, we desperately need new clean energy resources to keep pace with the demand. Renewable energy generated via wind, solar, geothermal, and tidal power will help to reduce our CO2 emissions by 80% of 1990 levels by 2050, but implementing these resources is challenging. In this Catalysis piece, Kaltsoyannis and Liddle explore the role that nuclear power will play in the future. In particular, they discuss the major problems associated with nuclear power and how chemists and fundamental chemical research can take a lead role in providing solutions to make it clean and support SDG 7. This catalyst article generates two reaction responses from Dame Sue Ion and Dr. Robin Taylor.
In the latest Catalysis piece, Professor Leif Hammarström from Uppsala University discusses one potential solution to SDG 7: utilizing the power of the sun to generate clean energy. This overview catalyzes a response from Professors Bolsen, Druckman, and Cook on the impact that accommodating such change would have on society.
ICIS,

ICIS EPCA Supplement 2015, pages 56-57, 26 September 2016

Future progress on managing climate change is in our hands
Landmark emissions targets were outlined at the COP21 meeting in Paris in 2015 and the chemical industry will play an important role in achieving them. The support of the chemical industry is vital for advancing SDG 13.2 to integrate climate change measures into national policies, strategies and planning. This report also emphasises the opportunities that climate action brings to the chemical industry.
In the US, land owners are liable for environmental impacts in relation to contaminated land. This Lexis Practice Advisor practice note explains what due diligence should be carried out in relation to the purchase of land/buildings to assess the environmental risk. Environmental due diligence advances SDG 3.9 to substantially reduce the number of deaths and illnesses from hazardous chemicals and air, water and soil pollution and contamination, and generally supports SDG 11 Sustainable cities and SDG 15 Life on land.

Pages