Climate change

Elsevier,

Current Opinion in Behavioral Sciences, Volume 42, December 2021

Environmental values and identities are consistent motivators of climate action.
Elsevier,

Current Opinion in Behavioral Sciences, Volume 42, December 2021

Emotions are major drivers of climate change perceptions and actions, and positive and negative emotional communications can promote sustainable behavior.
Elsevier,

Current Opinion in Behavioral Sciences, Volume 42, December 2021

Using consumer behavior to improving our understanding of effective ways to mobilize consumers to mitigate climate change.
Diverse hunks of science information successfully reduce global warming denial. Scientific literacy in climate change education crucially facilitates acceptance. Directly addressing climate misinformation is useful in climate change cognition.
Elsevier,

Current Opinion in Behavioral Sciences, Volume 42, December 2021

Three basic social concerns are important to climate change: prosociality, egalitarianism, and concern with animals.
The Campbell paradigm, in which a particular behavior is controlled by a single reason or goal, is presented in the context of climate change mitigation.
This is a jointly-published editorial in line with the UN General Assembly to encourage the policy to be adopted but also to raise the profile of health professionals in the debate over climate change.
Research into how cyclones are becoming more common due to climate change and the affects cyclones can have on disease outbreaks, resulting in a greater risk to public health.
Elsevier,

International Journal of Nursing Studies, Volume 123, November 2021

A plea to all nurses and midwives to join a global movement to avert a disaster on a global scale before it is too late.
With successful reproduction and recruitment fundamental to the continued persistence of fish populations under future climate conditions, understanding the physiological mechanisms – including taxonomic and population variation – wherein high temperatures lead to reduced reproductive performance is crucial to identify and remediate any reproductive impairment caused by warming aquatic habitats. Future endocrine studies have an important role to play to that end, as understanding the hormone mechanisms that underlie reproductive inhibition at high temperature, as well as extending our understanding of those mechanisms to consider the potential ability for fish to acclimate either through prior developmental thermal experience or via transgenerational and epigenetic mechanisms (e.g., Veilleux et al., 2018), will be crucial for predicting how wild fish populations will be affected by climate warming. The results presented here and elsewhere for other species (e.g., Alix et al., 2020; Servili et al., 2020) have a crucial role to play by serving as a foundation to guide future research into how extreme warm temperatures predicted under future climate scenarios will impact fish reproduction.

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