Climate change

Climate services for health is an emerging discipline aiming to help health professionals better understand the effect of climate and weather conditions on health, and ultimately, to anticipate disease risk consequent upon climate change. This article shows the connections of goal 3 (good health and wellbeing) and goal 13 (climate action) in its application of climate services for health to dengue fever.
This paper proposes a socio-technical perspective of fossil fuel subsidies and their reform. This persepctive is applied to cases of the South African and Tunisian energy sectors. Fossil fuel subsidies co-evolve with and are locked-in by national energy systems. Renewable energy technologies can help destabilize this fossil fuel subsidy regime. This paper relates to SDG 7.
Elsevier,

Journal of Cleaner Production, Volume 155, Part 1, 2017, Pages 105-118, ISSN 0959-6526,

Climate change, population growth and rapidly increasing urbanisation severely threaten water quantity and quality in Sub-Saharan Africa. Treating wastewater is necessary to preserve the water bodies; reusing treated wastewater appears a viable option that could help to address future water challenges. In areas already suffering energy poverty, the main barrier to wastewater treatment is the high electricity demand of most facilities. This work aims to assess the benefits of integrating renewable energy technologies to satisfy the energy needs of a wastewater treatment facility based on a conventional activated sludge system, and also considers the case of including a membrane bioreactor so treated wastewater can be reused for irrigation.
It is no secret to anyone living in Beirut or a similar modern city in a semi-arid tropical country in the summer that their home has become a concrete forest and an urban heat island. Old wood or stone houses and their gardens have been replaced by concrete towers and parking lots, in the name of development. The result is searing summer nights, a drastic loss of insect and avian biodiversity, and a large increase in energy usage for interior climate control. These problems are experienced in rapidly developing urban centers worldwide. Moreover, cities worldwide are struggling with waste disposal. Roof gardens can help solve both problems highlighting synergies with a number of SDGs, including 7 and 11.
This collection of articles from the Editors of Environment International Journal explore the impact of climate change on health. The collection demonstrates the interconnectedness of SDG 13 and SDG 3. Understanding the changes and associated impact allows us to develop appropriate adaptive policies and practices to respond to climate-sensitive health risks.
Elsevier,

The Lancet Planetary Health, Volume 1, Issue 2, May 2017, Pages e48-e49

This brief article presents a renewed and strengthened version of Kate Raworth’s well-known Doughnut model, which describes the social and ecological boundaries to human wellbeing. The model shows twelve dimensions and their illustrative indicators are derived from internationally agreed minimum standards for human wellbeing, and it relates to nearly all of the SDGs.
Elsevier,

Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Volume 71, 2017, Pages 12-28, ISSN 1364-0321

The article supports SDG 7: Affordable and Clean Energy. It analyses the top 5 emerging renewable energies which include marine energy, concentrated solar photovoltaics, enhanced geothermal energy, cellulosic ethanol and artificial photosynthesis. This supports the SDG 7 goal to ensure access to affordable, reliable, sustainable and modern energy for all. The article also highlights the economic aspects, giving insights on the development and scope of CO2 mitigation for renewable, clean and sustainable developments that supports SDG 13 that covers action to combat climate change and its impacts by utilization of renewable energy.
Elsevier,

Sustainable Cities and Society, Volume 31, 2017, Pages 12-25

Urbanization is transforming human society in many ways. Besides all the obvious benefits, it also brings negative impacts such as the well-documented urban heat island (UHI) effect and the magnified human heat stress. One way to reduce human heat stress is to increase vegetation density in urban areas, because they can provide evatranspiration and shading benefits. This study investigated the impact of various trees on urban micrometeorological conditions in both open space and high density settings, and how they regulate outdoor thermal comfort contributing to SDGs 11 and 15. This study suggests that urban trees should be planted strategically to improve human thermal comfort as an integral part of all modern urban developments.
Elsevier,

Energy Policy, Volume 104, May 2017, Pages 431-438

Strong discrepancy between ideal and actual climate policy explained by incentives of policy-makers. The Paris Agreement allows for a greater emphasis on national climate policies. Shifting priorities and maturing bureaucracies allows climate policies to focus on greenhouse gas emission reduction. working towards SDG 13.
This articles addresses SDG 17 - Partnerships for the SDG's. It highlights the needs of joint involvement of various sectors, using as an example The Converging World (TCW) partnership model which currently links south-west England and Tamil Nadu, raising funds for wind turbines in India to avert emissions from conventional sources and reinvesting operating surpluses into forest restoration. In this case the developing-developed world partnership offers equal opportunities in addressing the Climate Action element of SDG 13, serving as an example of positive partnerships in fulfilling the SDGs.

Pages